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Nuclear weapons are here to stay

by admin October 20, 2009

Nuclear weapons are here to stay

by admin October 20, 2009

North Korea is thinking about rejoining six-party nuclear disarmament talks according to sources inside the Chinese government. North Korea would prefer to sit down with the United States one on one, but the Washington has ruled out such a meeting until North Korea shows some commitment to joining the talks.
The six-party talks aim to get North Korea to relinquish its nuclear cache and allow for inspections. The other five parties at the table are South Korea, the United States, Russia, China and Japan. The group formed in response to North Korea’s 2003 decision to leave the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.
Earlier this year, North Korea freaked out the international community with multiple missile launches, underground nuclear test, and a series of short-range rocket launches. As a result, the United Nations imposed sanctions on the communist nation. Now the most secretive state in the world is trying to improve its public image so that the world will reward it with less harmful regulations.
Recently, North Korea released American journalists after former President Bill Clinton visited, resumed tourism talks with South Korea, and released South Korean captives, all in acts of supposed good faith.
But apparently North Korea is also almost finished renovating their main nuclear reactor that they shut down two years ago when they were still participating in the six-nation talks.
North Korea thought it could fool everyone into thinking it was dismantling its nuclear weaponry program over the past few years, while it was covertly developing it. But the West finally caught on and aren’t laughing.
In the bipolar international climate of the Cold War, the communists and the capitalists kept checks on one another, so full-fledged nuclear warfare never came to pass.
We don’t have that luxury in the modern world; it’s not red and white anymore.
There is no easy answer to the issue of nuclear disarmament; the problem is that it’s also about maintaining power and the benefits for citizens of powerful countries.
Right now there are 8,000 active nuclear warheads and about 23,300 total nuclear warheads in the world. A lot of the “decommissioned’ weapons were not destroyed but rather stored or partially dismantled.
Countries with nuclear weapons do not want to get rid of them. That would be like throwing your gun in the river because your enemies are unarmed. It doesn’t make sense when your enemies are in the process of buying guns themselves.
The philosophy behind non-proliferation makes a lot of sense however. When more countries have nuclear weapons, the world becomes less stable.
The world will never be rid of nuclear weapons. Even if they were all miraculously destroyed and all the technology to make them forgotten, the idea to make weapons of mass destruction, and thereby attain absolute power, cannot be erased from human consciousness.

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North Korea is thinking about rejoining six-party nuclear disarmament talks according to sources inside the Chinese government. North Korea would prefer to sit down with the United States one on one, but the Washington has ruled out such a meeting until North Korea shows some commitment to joining the talks.
The six-party talks aim to get North Korea to relinquish its nuclear cache and allow for inspections. The other five parties at the table are South Korea, the United States, Russia, China and Japan. The group formed in response to North Korea’s 2003 decision to leave the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.
Earlier this year, North Korea freaked out the international community with multiple missile launches, underground nuclear test, and a series of short-range rocket launches. As a result, the United Nations imposed sanctions on the communist nation. Now the most secretive state in the world is trying to improve its public image so that the world will reward it with less harmful regulations.
Recently, North Korea released American journalists after former President Bill Clinton visited, resumed tourism talks with South Korea, and released South Korean captives, all in acts of supposed good faith.
But apparently North Korea is also almost finished renovating their main nuclear reactor that they shut down two years ago when they were still participating in the six-nation talks.
North Korea thought it could fool everyone into thinking it was dismantling its nuclear weaponry program over the past few years, while it was covertly developing it. But the West finally caught on and aren’t laughing.
In the bipolar international climate of the Cold War, the communists and the capitalists kept checks on one another, so full-fledged nuclear warfare never came to pass.
We don’t have that luxury in the modern world; it’s not red and white anymore.
There is no easy answer to the issue of nuclear disarmament; the problem is that it’s also about maintaining power and the benefits for citizens of powerful countries.
Right now there are 8,000 active nuclear warheads and about 23,300 total nuclear warheads in the world. A lot of the “decommissioned’ weapons were not destroyed but rather stored or partially dismantled.
Countries with nuclear weapons do not want to get rid of them. That would be like throwing your gun in the river because your enemies are unarmed. It doesn’t make sense when your enemies are in the process of buying guns themselves.
The philosophy behind non-proliferation makes a lot of sense however. When more countries have nuclear weapons, the world becomes less stable.
The world will never be rid of nuclear weapons. Even if they were all miraculously destroyed and all the technology to make them forgotten, the idea to make weapons of mass destruction, and thereby attain absolute power, cannot be erased from human consciousness.

Leave a Comment