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Privacy in short supply in the online world

by admin October 13, 2009

Privacy in short supply in the online world

by admin October 13, 2009

An increasing number of young people live very public lives on the web, the Canadian Privacy Commissioner’s Office reported last week. Because of this phenomenon, the office is reminding students they can be held legally accountable for what they post, and advising them to take greater care to protect their privacy.
A recent TD Insurance poll showed 67 per cent of Canadians regretted a remark they wrote online, and 27 per cent did not think they were lawfully responsible for their comments.
Elisabeth Napolano, a Public Relations professional said, “In today’s social media universe, what you post online is in the public domain forever so it is essential that young people today exercise caution when posting on sites such as Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter.”
Caroline Lin, a student in Concordia’s Continuing Education program, agrees with Napolano’s statement.
“Nowadays, you can delete mean letters and bad photographs off the Internet, but somehow, somewhere, the information is likely backed-up on a server, to be kept forever,” Lin said.
Facebook is the second most visited site, according to Alexa.com, a web information company. People are turning to social media networks to build connections and share their daily lives with others, but sometimes without thinking of the consequences.
“A Twitter post that may seem harmless as a student may be seen as a liability when going for a job interview.” Napolano reminds young people, “Anything you post will appear on a Google search.”
The Canadian government wants students to be aware that comments and pictures posted on these sites are not only viewed by friends, but friends of friends, colleagues, and strangers. Their motto is “Think Before You Click,” because anyone can check what you download, and this can have a ripple effect.
“I think social networks are a great place to keep in touch,” Lin said. “That being said, I think people spend way too much time on Facebook.”

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An increasing number of young people live very public lives on the web, the Canadian Privacy Commissioner’s Office reported last week. Because of this phenomenon, the office is reminding students they can be held legally accountable for what they post, and advising them to take greater care to protect their privacy.
A recent TD Insurance poll showed 67 per cent of Canadians regretted a remark they wrote online, and 27 per cent did not think they were lawfully responsible for their comments.
Elisabeth Napolano, a Public Relations professional said, “In today’s social media universe, what you post online is in the public domain forever so it is essential that young people today exercise caution when posting on sites such as Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter.”
Caroline Lin, a student in Concordia’s Continuing Education program, agrees with Napolano’s statement.
“Nowadays, you can delete mean letters and bad photographs off the Internet, but somehow, somewhere, the information is likely backed-up on a server, to be kept forever,” Lin said.
Facebook is the second most visited site, according to Alexa.com, a web information company. People are turning to social media networks to build connections and share their daily lives with others, but sometimes without thinking of the consequences.
“A Twitter post that may seem harmless as a student may be seen as a liability when going for a job interview.” Napolano reminds young people, “Anything you post will appear on a Google search.”
The Canadian government wants students to be aware that comments and pictures posted on these sites are not only viewed by friends, but friends of friends, colleagues, and strangers. Their motto is “Think Before You Click,” because anyone can check what you download, and this can have a ripple effect.
“I think social networks are a great place to keep in touch,” Lin said. “That being said, I think people spend way too much time on Facebook.”

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