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Educating the heart: The power of compassion

by admin October 7, 2009 0 comment

Educating the heart: The power of compassion

by Archives October 6, 2009 0 comment

The Dalai Lama sat in the lotus position on a couch, slowly cleaning his yellow-tinted glasses as members of the press looked on. Thirty minutes later, Tibet’s spiritual and political leader faced an audience of 15,000, sitting in the same position, as he spoke about compassion, religion and procrastination.
Proving that even he has faults, the Dalai Lama admitted that he sometimes procrastinates when translating ancient texts. He told the crowd he always says he will do it “tomorrow, tomorrow,tomorrow,” until the last minute.
Though he admits it’s a bad habit, he advised others, especially students, against procrastinating. Even if young adults do put off important work, the Dalai Lama said he remains hopeful about the future, praising today’s youth for protesting wars and standing up for peace. Actions like these demonstrate that people have compassion and an ability to forgive, he said, forecasting that this can be “the century of peace.”
Tenzin Lobsang Wangkhang, who has been accompanying the Dalai Lama on his tour, said the Dalai Lama was eager to have as many students as possible attend his event in order to teach them “about the powers of compassion.”
Compassion, the spiritual leader said, is what will help the world achieve a status of peace.
Alluding to religious conflicts in the world and possible solutions, the Dalai Lama disagreed with the notion of having one world religion. “I think one religion for six billion human beings is the same thing as six billion human beings eating only one dish,” he said, laughing along with his audience. “People will eventually get fed up.”
The Dalai Lama made a point, though, of saying he does not hold all the answers, and is not a god-like being, despite what some may think.
He backed up his assertion with a story about gall bladder surgery he had last year. His need for surgery, and the complications he suffered during the operation “scientifically proves the Dalai Lama has no healing power,” he joked.
He admitted he was able to heal quickly, but credited that to his mental compassion, saying too much anger, hatred, and fear eat away at the body. A more compassionate mind, he said, makes for a healthier body and immune system.

The Dalai Lama sat in the lotus position on a couch, slowly cleaning his yellow-tinted glasses as members of the press looked on. Thirty minutes later, Tibet’s spiritual and political leader faced an audience of 15,000, sitting in the same position, as he spoke about compassion, religion and procrastination.
Proving that even he has faults, the Dalai Lama admitted that he sometimes procrastinates when translating ancient texts. He told the crowd he always says he will do it “tomorrow, tomorrow,tomorrow,” until the last minute.
Though he admits it’s a bad habit, he advised others, especially students, against procrastinating. Even if young adults do put off important work, the Dalai Lama said he remains hopeful about the future, praising today’s youth for protesting wars and standing up for peace. Actions like these demonstrate that people have compassion and an ability to forgive, he said, forecasting that this can be “the century of peace.”
Tenzin Lobsang Wangkhang, who has been accompanying the Dalai Lama on his tour, said the Dalai Lama was eager to have as many students as possible attend his event in order to teach them “about the powers of compassion.”
Compassion, the spiritual leader said, is what will help the world achieve a status of peace.
Alluding to religious conflicts in the world and possible solutions, the Dalai Lama disagreed with the notion of having one world religion. “I think one religion for six billion human beings is the same thing as six billion human beings eating only one dish,” he said, laughing along with his audience. “People will eventually get fed up.”
The Dalai Lama made a point, though, of saying he does not hold all the answers, and is not a god-like being, despite what some may think.
He backed up his assertion with a story about gall bladder surgery he had last year. His need for surgery, and the complications he suffered during the operation “scientifically proves the Dalai Lama has no healing power,” he joked.
He admitted he was able to heal quickly, but credited that to his mental compassion, saying too much anger, hatred, and fear eat away at the body. A more compassionate mind, he said, makes for a healthier body and immune system.

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