Home Canadian youth not eating enough fruits and vegetables: study

Canadian youth not eating enough fruits and vegetables: study

by admin November 3, 2009

Canadian youth not eating enough fruits and vegetables: study

by admin November 3, 2009

Nearly 25 per cent of Canadians between the ages of 18 and 34 don’t eat any fruits or vegetables on a daily basis, according to a study conducted for the Dietitians of Canada.
Nutrition experts say this is risky. The health issues involved with insufficient fruit and vegetable intake can range from obesity and diabetes to cardiac problems, according to Arelene Tenant, a physical education teacher and boot camp instructor.
She said everybody should be eating a minimum of five fruits and vegetables each day.
Kate Comeau, a registered dietitian working for ATP Nutrition, said many of the clients she sees have poor eating habits. A proper diet, she said, includes carbohydrates, proteins, and fats.
And the timing of meals is important too, she said.
“Make sure you spread your meals or snacks every three or four hours. Eating properly helps regulate your blood sugar and gives you energy throughout the day.”
Though a diet rich in vitamins and minerals is important for people of all ages, it can be especially important for students, Comeau said.
“Students who don’t eat enough will lack concentration, and won’t have the ability to focus on their studies.”
But food is only half the equation of a healthy lifestyle, Comeau stressed, noting that students should do something physically active every day.
Tenant agreed, saying it is critical to get up and move 8212; even if it’s only a 10 minute walk.
Health Canada reported a 5.3 per cent increase in activity levels of Canadians aged 20 to 34 between 1995 and 2007. But the Dietitians of Canada survey suggests there is much work left to do in terms of the overall health of Canadians.

Leave a Comment

Nearly 25 per cent of Canadians between the ages of 18 and 34 don’t eat any fruits or vegetables on a daily basis, according to a study conducted for the Dietitians of Canada.
Nutrition experts say this is risky. The health issues involved with insufficient fruit and vegetable intake can range from obesity and diabetes to cardiac problems, according to Arelene Tenant, a physical education teacher and boot camp instructor.
She said everybody should be eating a minimum of five fruits and vegetables each day.
Kate Comeau, a registered dietitian working for ATP Nutrition, said many of the clients she sees have poor eating habits. A proper diet, she said, includes carbohydrates, proteins, and fats.
And the timing of meals is important too, she said.
“Make sure you spread your meals or snacks every three or four hours. Eating properly helps regulate your blood sugar and gives you energy throughout the day.”
Though a diet rich in vitamins and minerals is important for people of all ages, it can be especially important for students, Comeau said.
“Students who don’t eat enough will lack concentration, and won’t have the ability to focus on their studies.”
But food is only half the equation of a healthy lifestyle, Comeau stressed, noting that students should do something physically active every day.
Tenant agreed, saying it is critical to get up and move 8212; even if it’s only a 10 minute walk.
Health Canada reported a 5.3 per cent increase in activity levels of Canadians aged 20 to 34 between 1995 and 2007. But the Dietitians of Canada survey suggests there is much work left to do in terms of the overall health of Canadians.

Leave a Comment