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Girls gone wild

by admin March 2, 2010

Girls gone wild

by admin March 2, 2010

The Canadian women’s hockey team said that they weren’t sure why their gold medals weren’t the center of attention at a press conference on Friday, following the media buzz around their beer-drinking celebration in Canada Hockey Place.
“I think we made Canadians proud, and I think that should be the story today,” said Jayna Hefford, an Ontario native who has had the second highest number of appearances at the international level after team captain Hayley Wickenheiser. “We’ve had a tough couple of years as a program . . . and for us to come here and win a gold medal in Canada, when a couple people said we were going to crack under the pressure, I think was a pretty good story last night.”

About an hour after the Canadian women won the game, they came back onto the ice and celebrated by drinking beer, smoking cigars, and posing beside the logo at centre ice. The photos of the celebrations spread quickly through the media, and an IOC director was quoted expressing disapproval, starting a minor controversy.
“We were hoping that ceremony would stay private,” said Québecois forward Caroline Ouellette. “We did that in Salt Lake, we did that in Torino, and we made sure all the fans had left the building. We didn’t want to offend anyone.”
According to Ouellette, the celebrations are an important part of the ritual for celebrating players. “For some of our girls, it’s the last time they’ll ever skate at the Olympics,” she said. “To go back on to that ice and just lay on it, or kiss it, or take pictures there is so special.”

Hockey Canada has issued an apology on the team’s behalf, and an IOC spokesperson told a press briefing that no formal investigation was planned.
More serious, however, are rumblings of discontent from Olympic organizers over the strength of the sport’s field. It is currently dominated by Canada, who had an aggregate score of 48-2 across all games, and the U.S., whose second-place finish totaled 42 goals to 4 against. IOC President Rogge told the Vancouver Sun that although the sport is currently in a growing period, “it cannot continue without improvement.”
Hefford said that the game needed more funding, and that other nations should look at adopting a residency program. According to Hefford, the Canadian team has been together in Calgary since Aug. 1. “It’s huge for us to be able to train together every day, to play against the best players,” she said.
“Hopefully the other countries can invest some funding into that and develop the full-time programs.”

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The Canadian women’s hockey team said that they weren’t sure why their gold medals weren’t the center of attention at a press conference on Friday, following the media buzz around their beer-drinking celebration in Canada Hockey Place.
“I think we made Canadians proud, and I think that should be the story today,” said Jayna Hefford, an Ontario native who has had the second highest number of appearances at the international level after team captain Hayley Wickenheiser. “We’ve had a tough couple of years as a program . . . and for us to come here and win a gold medal in Canada, when a couple people said we were going to crack under the pressure, I think was a pretty good story last night.”

About an hour after the Canadian women won the game, they came back onto the ice and celebrated by drinking beer, smoking cigars, and posing beside the logo at centre ice. The photos of the celebrations spread quickly through the media, and an IOC director was quoted expressing disapproval, starting a minor controversy.
“We were hoping that ceremony would stay private,” said Québecois forward Caroline Ouellette. “We did that in Salt Lake, we did that in Torino, and we made sure all the fans had left the building. We didn’t want to offend anyone.”
According to Ouellette, the celebrations are an important part of the ritual for celebrating players. “For some of our girls, it’s the last time they’ll ever skate at the Olympics,” she said. “To go back on to that ice and just lay on it, or kiss it, or take pictures there is so special.”

Hockey Canada has issued an apology on the team’s behalf, and an IOC spokesperson told a press briefing that no formal investigation was planned.
More serious, however, are rumblings of discontent from Olympic organizers over the strength of the sport’s field. It is currently dominated by Canada, who had an aggregate score of 48-2 across all games, and the U.S., whose second-place finish totaled 42 goals to 4 against. IOC President Rogge told the Vancouver Sun that although the sport is currently in a growing period, “it cannot continue without improvement.”
Hefford said that the game needed more funding, and that other nations should look at adopting a residency program. According to Hefford, the Canadian team has been together in Calgary since Aug. 1. “It’s huge for us to be able to train together every day, to play against the best players,” she said.
“Hopefully the other countries can invest some funding into that and develop the full-time programs.”

Leave a Comment