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by admin March 16, 2010

Letters to the Editor

by admin March 16, 2010

Letters to the Editor

by admin March 2, 2010

Letters to the Editor

by admin March 2, 2010

Re: “Volunteering: how helping others can help you” and “Jewish group criticizes Bloc for withdrawal from anti-semitism group” March 23

The article on volunteering by Emily White is journalism at its finest and most significant. Her work should be cut out and saved by anyone wanting to enrich their own life and those of others.
The article on the Bloc being criticized for withdrawing from an anti-hate group was informative for different reasons. The leader of the Bloc Qu̩b̩cois, Gilles Duceppe, was recently roundly condemned for linking his party to resistance movements implying the federal government Рto which his party has a large membership Рis a Nazi government which must be defeated in order to obtain liberation; Duceppe denies the reference.
The Bloc Québécois is able to get away with this obscene claim because there is an unwritten rule that the media tread very carefully in analyzing a party that favours the withdrawal of a significant part of the Canadian federation.
The last sentence of the article shows the paradox of human nature to its extreme limits when a spokesman claims their party ­­­­”‘desired a much more moderate approach, more consensual, and still with the outlook to find peace.”
The Bloc Québécois stands for nationalism and power, two of the most dangerous ideologies in history. Plato noted that wars are caused for economic reasons. Politicians use religion and nationalism as the main motivators to get people to engage in wars. It is unlikely many would fight if told it was to garner riches for others.
Nationalism and power must be checked at every opportunity if world peace is to be achieved.

David S. Rovins
Independent Student

Re: “Pirate of the sea” March 23

“Pirate of the Sea” documentary that appeared in this week’s edition of the Concordian by Max Chandler. I was particularly appalled by the section in which the writer described a confrontation with Newfoundland and Labrador sealers. The use of the phrase “their violence is overflowing” in reference to individuals trying to preserve their way of life in the face of confrontation was needlessly sensationalistic and surprisingly insensitive, especially considering the economic hardships faced by many of those engage in the occupation of sealing. While the timeliness of showing the harvest of white coats in a documentary is of questionable utility, given the fact that the practice has been banned in Canada since at least 2000, the depiction of the Newfoundlanders and Labradorians in this review was unnecessary and offensive.

Alexa Martin-Storey

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Re: “The niqab debate,’ March 16

Although as they say in the business it was a slow news week (more accurate to state a no news week), when a woman wearing a specific outfit makes national headlines pushing out the continual worry about the Iranian threat to world peace with its ongoing attempt to manufacture a nuclear weapon, the Concordian did the debate justice by giving both sides of the argument which is journalism at its finest.
Religious freedom is not absolute, although wars are fought for economic reasons as Plato alerted the world so long ago; politicians use the most powerful emotional trigger – religion – to get people to slaughter one another. More people have been mass murdered historically in the name of religion than for any other reason.
We live in what is referred to as a Judeo-Christian civilization, where the Ten Commandments and the Sermon on the Mount are considered the most basic doctrines of our civilization.
Although in reality, other than a few noteworthy exceptions such as Florence Nightingale, Jesus was the last Jew and the first and last Christian.
However, some of his values have slowly and surely penetrated our consciousness after so many centuries and that is the equality of all human beings. Female and male equality took many, many centuries to be accepted, at least philosophically, if not in reality, in the social-political sphere.
But we believe that is a fundamental value we cannot deviate from.
We believe honour killings are cold-blooded murder, the gravest sin, we believe female genital mutilation is barbaric torture almost beyond human imagination.
When a woman so clothes herself that she can see others and yet no one can see her that is deeply troubling in an age of insecurity and terrorism and it also sets up a troubling elitism.

– David Sommer Rovins
Independent Student

Re: “Get rid of the CFS,’ March 9

Amine Dabchy is quick to tell us why Concordia students should cease their relationship with the Canadian Federation of Students. The real issue is, and has always been, the responsibility of a student union to promote the campaigns and services of the CFS on their campus. All Dabchy and his executives have done this year is try to create a common enemy in the CFS. If students know of the CFS, it is because Dabchy has turned his back on the services and campaigns of the CFS for his own political advantage.
As a former Concordia Student Union vice-president, I will take some of the blame for not finding the time to promote the great work that the CFS has done for a more socially just Canada, and for not giving them credit for the help they provided me during my time in office.
As the first VP to cover both the Loyola and the Sustainability portfolio, I was fortunate enough to benefit from CFS’s guidance and resources when devising the structure for the Loyola Luncheon – the free vegan lunch program Loyola students had been seeking for years.
Further, my executive was the only one in Quebec that was able to successfully shut down increases to international tuition fees. Five times. Our efforts saved international students over $1 million. Our campaigns would not have known the success they did had we not been under the council of the (then functional) CFS-Q office and their organizer, George Soule.
Dabchy has chosen to run for Board of Governors while affiliated with the Fusion slate. Fusion both promotes disaffiliation with the CFS and the elimination of the sale of bottled water on campus. The four schools that have successfully lobbied their administrations to phase out the sale of bottled water are all active members of the CFS, and the CFS has lead the charge on this campaign. It seems odd that they would want to break away from a group of students when they have the same interests at heart.
I sincerely hope that Concordia students think about the benefits of continued membership in the CFS, as well as to the many pratfalls of ceasing to be a part of something larger then all of us.
In a society of individualism, I hope we will remember the true notion of solidarity.

– Mathieu Murphy-Perron
Former member of the CFS Board of Directors
Former Fine Arts Student Alliance VP
Former CSU VP Loyola & Sustainability

Former CEO Speaks Out

This needs to be said. I was hired in December to run the Arts and Science Federation of Associations’ student union elections. Entering into the position, I had great hopes of learning more legal and management skills, and yes, helping my fellow students. But as the position went on, I learned how despicable those who run, and seek to run this school’s student politics are. Now, that isn’t to say they’re all bad – there are certainly some great people at ASFA and to a lesser extent, the CSU. But damn! I cannot believe what many students do.
Call me small town-minded (I’m from Lantzville, BC) or old-fashioned, but I always believed we should try to conduct our lives in a manner considerate and empathetic towards others. Such is not the case in Concordia politics. I’ve seen cheating, manipulation, lies, lies and lies, abuses of power, back-stabbing, corruption, harassment and literal physical assault. Why does this keep happening? It’s because most of us see our time at Concordia as transitory. Well this needs to stop.
I came into ASFA politics because I wanted to make things better, but all I have seen is hatred, a lack of human decency and hidden agendas. I never wanted to take up a side, I only wanted to make things better, but now it seems the best way to do so this is to help a side. I don’t want to tell you who to vote for in the CSU elections, but as someone who always wanted to be a neutral third party, I have to say, if you want to vote making Concordia’s politics decent again – a CSU that is made up of real students, and not these little Nixons, please take a look at Community. The CSU isn’t a real government, it’s a student government, and it’s about time we start acting like it – here is a good start.
Thanks for reading 🙂

– Colby Briggs
Former ASFA Chief Electoral Officer

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Re: “The niqab debate,’ March 16

Although as they say in the business it was a slow news week (more accurate to state a no news week), when a woman wearing a specific outfit makes national headlines pushing out the continual worry about the Iranian threat to world peace with its ongoing attempt to manufacture a nuclear weapon, the Concordian did the debate justice by giving both sides of the argument which is journalism at its finest.
Religious freedom is not absolute, although wars are fought for economic reasons as Plato alerted the world so long ago; politicians use the most powerful emotional trigger – religion – to get people to slaughter one another. More people have been mass murdered historically in the name of religion than for any other reason.
We live in what is referred to as a Judeo-Christian civilization, where the Ten Commandments and the Sermon on the Mount are considered the most basic doctrines of our civilization.
Although in reality, other than a few noteworthy exceptions such as Florence Nightingale, Jesus was the last Jew and the first and last Christian.
However, some of his values have slowly and surely penetrated our consciousness after so many centuries and that is the equality of all human beings. Female and male equality took many, many centuries to be accepted, at least philosophically, if not in reality, in the social-political sphere.
But we believe that is a fundamental value we cannot deviate from.
We believe honour killings are cold-blooded murder, the gravest sin, we believe female genital mutilation is barbaric torture almost beyond human imagination.
When a woman so clothes herself that she can see others and yet no one can see her that is deeply troubling in an age of insecurity and terrorism and it also sets up a troubling elitism.

– David Sommer Rovins
Independent Student

Re: “Get rid of the CFS,’ March 9

Amine Dabchy is quick to tell us why Concordia students should cease their relationship with the Canadian Federation of Students. The real issue is, and has always been, the responsibility of a student union to promote the campaigns and services of the CFS on their campus. All Dabchy and his executives have done this year is try to create a common enemy in the CFS. If students know of the CFS, it is because Dabchy has turned his back on the services and campaigns of the CFS for his own political advantage.
As a former Concordia Student Union vice-president, I will take some of the blame for not finding the time to promote the great work that the CFS has done for a more socially just Canada, and for not giving them credit for the help they provided me during my time in office.
As the first VP to cover both the Loyola and the Sustainability portfolio, I was fortunate enough to benefit from CFS’s guidance and resources when devising the structure for the Loyola Luncheon – the free vegan lunch program Loyola students had been seeking for years.
Further, my executive was the only one in Quebec that was able to successfully shut down increases to international tuition fees. Five times. Our efforts saved international students over $1 million. Our campaigns would not have known the success they did had we not been under the council of the (then functional) CFS-Q office and their organizer, George Soule.
Dabchy has chosen to run for Board of Governors while affiliated with the Fusion slate. Fusion both promotes disaffiliation with the CFS and the elimination of the sale of bottled water on campus. The four schools that have successfully lobbied their administrations to phase out the sale of bottled water are all active members of the CFS, and the CFS has lead the charge on this campaign. It seems odd that they would want to break away from a group of students when they have the same interests at heart.
I sincerely hope that Concordia students think about the benefits of continued membership in the CFS, as well as to the many pratfalls of ceasing to be a part of something larger then all of us.
In a society of individualism, I hope we will remember the true notion of solidarity.

– Mathieu Murphy-Perron
Former member of the CFS Board of Directors
Former Fine Arts Student Alliance VP
Former CSU VP Loyola & Sustainability

Former CEO Speaks Out

This needs to be said. I was hired in December to run the Arts and Science Federation of Associations’ student union elections. Entering into the position, I had great hopes of learning more legal and management skills, and yes, helping my fellow students. But as the position went on, I learned how despicable those who run, and seek to run this school’s student politics are. Now, that isn’t to say they’re all bad – there are certainly some great people at ASFA and to a lesser extent, the CSU. But damn! I cannot believe what many students do.
Call me small town-minded (I’m from Lantzville, BC) or old-fashioned, but I always believed we should try to conduct our lives in a manner considerate and empathetic towards others. Such is not the case in Concordia politics. I’ve seen cheating, manipulation, lies, lies and lies, abuses of power, back-stabbing, corruption, harassment and literal physical assault. Why does this keep happening? It’s because most of us see our time at Concordia as transitory. Well this needs to stop.
I came into ASFA politics because I wanted to make things better, but all I have seen is hatred, a lack of human decency and hidden agendas. I never wanted to take up a side, I only wanted to make things better, but now it seems the best way to do so this is to help a side. I don’t want to tell you who to vote for in the CSU elections, but as someone who always wanted to be a neutral third party, I have to say, if you want to vote making Concordia’s politics decent again – a CSU that is made up of real students, and not these little Nixons, please take a look at Community. The CSU isn’t a real government, it’s a student government, and it’s about time we start acting like it – here is a good start.
Thanks for reading 🙂

– Colby Briggs
Former ASFA Chief Electoral Officer

Leave a Comment

Re: Three articles in March 9 issue

Shawn Katz wrote one of the most important and informative pieces, “Canadian democracy in danger,” summing up the anti-democratic actions of our current prime minister. He should have dwelt more on the first aspect of this dossier which is Stephen Harper’s refusal to hand documents over as demanded by Parliament. This is as serious a violation of democratic principles as can be imagined and strengthens a now growing belief that he is sheltering certain individuals including himself from war crimes. Where Katz’s argument breaks down is his look to the current Liberal leader for salvation. The reason Harper has been able to get away with these shenanigans is precisely because of tremendous weakness in the opposition. That there is not one member of the Senate that is protected from elections, or one member of the House of Commons to severely and unequivocally denounce Harper is extremely bad for the upholding of our liberty.
The Editorial “The language of hypocrisy” attempts to be so broad-minded and even-handed that it fails to expose the problem of hate speech on which there can be no compromise. Israel, like many nations on this globe, has many aspects to its political behaviour that can be condemned – apartheid is not one of them. To tar the only democracy in the Middle East with the label of another country that no longer practices that legal system is more than the big lie envisioned by master propagandists; it is hate speech.
On a much more positive note, the article “Dating in the Digital Age” by Philip Fry may point to a small but significant way we can ameliorate the human condition. The Internet is bringing humanity together and with the most important research on the psychology of evil by Professor Emeritus Philip Zimbardo and past research on obedience by Stanley Milgram and morality by Laurence Kohlberg, the solutions to solve the above problems of hate, violence and war are painstakingly being worked out by social scientists. And in this year of tribute to the genius of Charles Darwin, there is reason to be hopeful and optimistic that the great minds at work on the problem of human relations will solve our predicament.

David S. Rovins
Independent Student

Re: Letter, March 2

Dear Concordian,

While I thank you for actually printing my letter in your paper, I wish you hadn’t printed two editorial notes in the middle of the letter I wrote two weeks ago. It seemed disrespectful not to let me say my share about a legitimate issue I had with your work. If you print something nominal and particular to me that’s incorrect, I have full rights to tell you. Sorry guys, but I’m allowed to call myself what I want: when I state that I am not a campaign manager, it is not up to Colby [Briggs], or to you to state otherwise.
This seems like basic journalism etiquette. Also, the fee levy that we pay you is supposed to be contributing to every student’s right for a voice in this paper. You are essentially student space. Though this isn’t the first time the Concordian has endowed a notus interruptus into my letter, this will probably be the last letter interrupted – I’m graduating! I’m so close to the end, I’m not even gonna write you a CFS-scorning diatribe! Oh, also, though, while I’m talking to you guys, I think you should change your policy where you only accept letters that refer specifically to an article in your paper. Readers should be able to write you any letter they’d like, as long as it isn’t hurtful to other readers.
Yours,

Beisan Zubi
VP Internal
Political Science Students Association

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Re: Three articles in March 9 issue

Shawn Katz wrote one of the most important and informative pieces, “Canadian democracy in danger,” summing up the anti-democratic actions of our current prime minister. He should have dwelt more on the first aspect of this dossier which is Stephen Harper’s refusal to hand documents over as demanded by Parliament. This is as serious a violation of democratic principles as can be imagined and strengthens a now growing belief that he is sheltering certain individuals including himself from war crimes. Where Katz’s argument breaks down is his look to the current Liberal leader for salvation. The reason Harper has been able to get away with these shenanigans is precisely because of tremendous weakness in the opposition. That there is not one member of the Senate that is protected from elections, or one member of the House of Commons to severely and unequivocally denounce Harper is extremely bad for the upholding of our liberty.
The Editorial “The language of hypocrisy” attempts to be so broad-minded and even-handed that it fails to expose the problem of hate speech on which there can be no compromise. Israel, like many nations on this globe, has many aspects to its political behaviour that can be condemned – apartheid is not one of them. To tar the only democracy in the Middle East with the label of another country that no longer practices that legal system is more than the big lie envisioned by master propagandists; it is hate speech.
On a much more positive note, the article “Dating in the Digital Age” by Philip Fry may point to a small but significant way we can ameliorate the human condition. The Internet is bringing humanity together and with the most important research on the psychology of evil by Professor Emeritus Philip Zimbardo and past research on obedience by Stanley Milgram and morality by Laurence Kohlberg, the solutions to solve the above problems of hate, violence and war are painstakingly being worked out by social scientists. And in this year of tribute to the genius of Charles Darwin, there is reason to be hopeful and optimistic that the great minds at work on the problem of human relations will solve our predicament.

David S. Rovins
Independent Student

Re: Letter, March 2

Dear Concordian,

While I thank you for actually printing my letter in your paper, I wish you hadn’t printed two editorial notes in the middle of the letter I wrote two weeks ago. It seemed disrespectful not to let me say my share about a legitimate issue I had with your work. If you print something nominal and particular to me that’s incorrect, I have full rights to tell you. Sorry guys, but I’m allowed to call myself what I want: when I state that I am not a campaign manager, it is not up to Colby [Briggs], or to you to state otherwise.
This seems like basic journalism etiquette. Also, the fee levy that we pay you is supposed to be contributing to every student’s right for a voice in this paper. You are essentially student space. Though this isn’t the first time the Concordian has endowed a notus interruptus into my letter, this will probably be the last letter interrupted – I’m graduating! I’m so close to the end, I’m not even gonna write you a CFS-scorning diatribe! Oh, also, though, while I’m talking to you guys, I think you should change your policy where you only accept letters that refer specifically to an article in your paper. Readers should be able to write you any letter they’d like, as long as it isn’t hurtful to other readers.
Yours,

Beisan Zubi
VP Internal
Political Science Students Association

Leave a Comment

Re: “Le Frigo Vert fee levy increase will be put to student vote” Feb. 16

In light of recent criticisms of the Frigo Vert, I’d like to say that I shop there all the time. It’s great, and it needs our support.
One of the great things about Concordia, as opposed to say, McGill (I’m an alumni), is that you won’t be forced by hunger to pay seven dollars for a sad slimy ‘grilled vegetable’ panini made by employees being paid minimum wage by a corporation that also makes prison food. This is partly because Concordia is in a way better part of town, snack-wise, but also because Concordia students have worked for a long time to provide affordable, healthy food to one another by founding the People’s Potato and Frigo Vert, not to mention that unsung free Loyola Luncheon at Loyola Campus. Having good food to eat is an important part of being a healthy and successful student, and we all know that many users of food banks are students. The Frigo Vert keeps students healthy and out of food banks by providing affordable organic foods right on campus. It’s a service we should be proud of, and it’s a service we should continue to stand behind.

Holly Nazar
MA Media Studies

———————————————————————————-

Re: “Breaking the Canadian consensus,” Feb. 16

The foreign policy opinion piece by Shawn Katz is an attempt to enter the most difficult area of analysis: that of the Middle East. There is no more severe critic of Prime Minister Stephen Harper than myself. After the slaughter at Dawson College he not only refused to strengthen the gun control laws as was asked of him by numerous individuals, but he brought forth legislation to weaken them while being totally dishonest in claiming he stood for law and order. Any politician that places money from the gun lobby to keep himself in power at the cost of human lives should be impeached and forever forbidden to participate in public life.
That being said I totally disagree with the condemnation of Harper for his Middle East policy. Indeed his policy to unwaveringly condemn the vicious terrorist organizations in the Middle East, and the non-existent human rights policy of a most barbaric China, has earned him and our country worldwide respect. I only wish Harper was as ethical in his domestic policy as he is in his international policy.

David Sommer Rovins
Independent Student

——————————————————————————–

Re: The Concordian’s coverage of the ASFA elections, Feb. 16

I have to say I am disappointed with all of the reporting about the recent ASFA elections in the Concordian.
Tyson Lowrie’s piece was a terrific example of lazy journalism. Correction: I am not the New Energy “campaign manager.” While I have helped them with complete devotion and believe deeply in their capabilities, they are not being ‘managed’ by me. I take offence at the use of the term campaign manager and its masculinist, top-down connotations.
(Editor’s note: Zubi was officially identified as “New Energy’s” campaign manager by ASFA CEO Colby Briggs)
Secondly, the contestation filed about people attempting to coerce my teammates into dropping out, made no mention of Innovation or the CSU (as these are entities and not PEOPLE) as the ones who approached them to drop out. The coercers were mentioned by name, and not affiliation.
(Editor’s note: In his contestation New Energy presidential candidate Joel Suss wrote: “the CSU is actively interfering to aid the ‘Innovation’ affiliation … CSU President [Amine] Dabchy and CSU Councillor [Vanessa] O’Connor were working with the ‘Innovation’ affiliation in an attempt to illegally influence the election and use the considerable resources of the CSU to ensure that ‘Innovation’ won the election.” The team also requested that Innovation be disqualified from the election)

Furthermore, the editorial was absolutely stupid. Where do I begin? 1. Maybe students feel apathetic about student politics because you treat it like a joke. 2. Tuition increases are a valid concern for all students and for you to say “oh well ASFA can’t do shit about it” shows your lack of dedication to student issues. EVERYONE has to be doing something about it for anyone to take notice. 3. Maybe if you had interviewed the candidates, instead of just issuing editorial stances on how no one focuses on “the issues,” you would be better than the mud you yourselves sling.
It is with regret I write this letter because I really like a lot of members of your staff, but being mean and unhelpful just for the sake of it is not the level of quality I would expect from this newspaper.
Yours,

Beisan Zubi
Vice-President Internal
Political Science Students Association

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Re: “Le Frigo Vert fee levy increase will be put to student vote” Feb. 16

In light of recent criticisms of the Frigo Vert, I’d like to say that I shop there all the time. It’s great, and it needs our support.
One of the great things about Concordia, as opposed to say, McGill (I’m an alumni), is that you won’t be forced by hunger to pay seven dollars for a sad slimy ‘grilled vegetable’ panini made by employees being paid minimum wage by a corporation that also makes prison food. This is partly because Concordia is in a way better part of town, snack-wise, but also because Concordia students have worked for a long time to provide affordable, healthy food to one another by founding the People’s Potato and Frigo Vert, not to mention that unsung free Loyola Luncheon at Loyola Campus. Having good food to eat is an important part of being a healthy and successful student, and we all know that many users of food banks are students. The Frigo Vert keeps students healthy and out of food banks by providing affordable organic foods right on campus. It’s a service we should be proud of, and it’s a service we should continue to stand behind.

Holly Nazar
MA Media Studies

———————————————————————————-

Re: “Breaking the Canadian consensus,” Feb. 16

The foreign policy opinion piece by Shawn Katz is an attempt to enter the most difficult area of analysis: that of the Middle East. There is no more severe critic of Prime Minister Stephen Harper than myself. After the slaughter at Dawson College he not only refused to strengthen the gun control laws as was asked of him by numerous individuals, but he brought forth legislation to weaken them while being totally dishonest in claiming he stood for law and order. Any politician that places money from the gun lobby to keep himself in power at the cost of human lives should be impeached and forever forbidden to participate in public life.
That being said I totally disagree with the condemnation of Harper for his Middle East policy. Indeed his policy to unwaveringly condemn the vicious terrorist organizations in the Middle East, and the non-existent human rights policy of a most barbaric China, has earned him and our country worldwide respect. I only wish Harper was as ethical in his domestic policy as he is in his international policy.

David Sommer Rovins
Independent Student

——————————————————————————–

Re: The Concordian’s coverage of the ASFA elections, Feb. 16

I have to say I am disappointed with all of the reporting about the recent ASFA elections in the Concordian.
Tyson Lowrie’s piece was a terrific example of lazy journalism. Correction: I am not the New Energy “campaign manager.” While I have helped them with complete devotion and believe deeply in their capabilities, they are not being ‘managed’ by me. I take offence at the use of the term campaign manager and its masculinist, top-down connotations.
(Editor’s note: Zubi was officially identified as “New Energy’s” campaign manager by ASFA CEO Colby Briggs)
Secondly, the contestation filed about people attempting to coerce my teammates into dropping out, made no mention of Innovation or the CSU (as these are entities and not PEOPLE) as the ones who approached them to drop out. The coercers were mentioned by name, and not affiliation.
(Editor’s note: In his contestation New Energy presidential candidate Joel Suss wrote: “the CSU is actively interfering to aid the ‘Innovation’ affiliation … CSU President [Amine] Dabchy and CSU Councillor [Vanessa] O’Connor were working with the ‘Innovation’ affiliation in an attempt to illegally influence the election and use the considerable resources of the CSU to ensure that ‘Innovation’ won the election.” The team also requested that Innovation be disqualified from the election)

Furthermore, the editorial was absolutely stupid. Where do I begin? 1. Maybe students feel apathetic about student politics because you treat it like a joke. 2. Tuition increases are a valid concern for all students and for you to say “oh well ASFA can’t do shit about it” shows your lack of dedication to student issues. EVERYONE has to be doing something about it for anyone to take notice. 3. Maybe if you had interviewed the candidates, instead of just issuing editorial stances on how no one focuses on “the issues,” you would be better than the mud you yourselves sling.
It is with regret I write this letter because I really like a lot of members of your staff, but being mean and unhelpful just for the sake of it is not the level of quality I would expect from this newspaper.
Yours,

Beisan Zubi
Vice-President Internal
Political Science Students Association

Leave a Comment