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New media focus of globalization conference

by admin March 23, 2010

New media focus of globalization conference

by admin March 23, 2010

Advancements in technologies like the Internet and cell phones have played a bigger role in globalization than any conquest in history ever has, NDP MP for Outremont Thomas Mulcair said while speaking at Concordia March 19.
But, he warned, there are limits to the advantages associated with having the world at your fingertips.
Mulcair was joined by other guests last week at the fifth annual conference on globalization hosted by the Loyola International College in conjunction with its sister school, the Siena College of New York.

The discussions this year touched on a variety of topics including the effects of globalization on indigenous people and the environment, and how technology has served to advance the globalization phenomenon.
“Music is being globalized . . . will the world come to a globalization of values?” Mulcair asked his audience.
While borders might become blurred between different countries’ ideologies and ways of life, what’s happening at home remains an important factor that students can control, Mulcair said.

“At the end of the day, what decides how much pollution should go into our rivers, or how much greenhouse gases Canada produces 8212; it’s political,” he said, urging students to get involved in their communities and vote in elections.
The assistant principal of Loyola International College and one of the event’s organizers, Adan Suazo, echoed the MP’s thoughts on becoming involved.
“What’s the point of living in a democratic society if students are not exercising their rights to get involved,” he said.
Loyola International College Student Association president Richard Leschiutta said the experience of bringing the two schools of thought together was a great one. “I’m glad we can connect with our sister school,” he said, “because this event is all about building community.”

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Advancements in technologies like the Internet and cell phones have played a bigger role in globalization than any conquest in history ever has, NDP MP for Outremont Thomas Mulcair said while speaking at Concordia March 19.
But, he warned, there are limits to the advantages associated with having the world at your fingertips.
Mulcair was joined by other guests last week at the fifth annual conference on globalization hosted by the Loyola International College in conjunction with its sister school, the Siena College of New York.

The discussions this year touched on a variety of topics including the effects of globalization on indigenous people and the environment, and how technology has served to advance the globalization phenomenon.
“Music is being globalized . . . will the world come to a globalization of values?” Mulcair asked his audience.
While borders might become blurred between different countries’ ideologies and ways of life, what’s happening at home remains an important factor that students can control, Mulcair said.

“At the end of the day, what decides how much pollution should go into our rivers, or how much greenhouse gases Canada produces 8212; it’s political,” he said, urging students to get involved in their communities and vote in elections.
The assistant principal of Loyola International College and one of the event’s organizers, Adan Suazo, echoed the MP’s thoughts on becoming involved.
“What’s the point of living in a democratic society if students are not exercising their rights to get involved,” he said.
Loyola International College Student Association president Richard Leschiutta said the experience of bringing the two schools of thought together was a great one. “I’m glad we can connect with our sister school,” he said, “because this event is all about building community.”

Leave a Comment