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What the budget means for you

by admin March 9, 2010

What the budget means for you

by admin March 9, 2010

Tories reinstate some research funding, offer limited post-secondary education support

OTTAWA (CUP) 8212; While its title was “Leading the Way on Jobs and Growth,” the Conservatives’ March 4 federal budget offered little for students seeking such prosperity in the near future.
The biggest announcement in the over 400-page document offered $19 billion in stimulus funding to complete the Tories’ Economic Action Plan. The two-year program launched in the 2009 budget has supported post-secondary education in the form of a $2 billion Knowledge Infrastructure Program announced last year 8212; an initiative that many universities and colleges still have yet to benefit from. The majority of that targeted spending is set to end in March 2011.
Finance Minister Jim Flaherty explained the winding down of stimulus spending will help cut the annual deficit 8212; projected to be $53.8 billion this year 8212; nearly in half by 2012.
In order to reach smaller deficits without tax raises, however, cuts in government spending had to be made.
“This is a tough budget . . . Some very difficult decisions have been made,” Flaherty told reporters prior to his speech in the House of Commons. “Most of the answers to requests for funding were “No.'”

Employment support present, educational support lacking

Alongside announcements for some general job-creation and job-protection measures, the Conservatives offered limited funding to help Canadian students find work 8212; including a one-year increase of $30 million for youth internships, set to take effect this year.
“Thirty million dollars, I think, is a great investment in a career-focus aspect. . . . I think this will help in terms of getting students into the workforce, but the issue is that about five years after a recession is when student jobs start to come back,” said Arati Sharma, Canadian Alliance of Student Associations national director. “So $30 million is a first step, but it’s going to take a long time for students to get back into the workforce.”
Another $30 million was earmarked for programs aimed at helping young immigrants, Aboriginal Canadians and single parents gain work experience. Accessibility to post-secondary education was the goal in giving $20 million to help high school students make it to university and college through the Pathways to Education Canada program.

The most significant, yet lacking-in-detail mention of educational support was in a vague “new approach” the government plans to take in terms of post-secondary education funding for Aboriginal students, which will be “co-ordinated with other federal student support programs.”
“It was kind of a non-announcement in a lot of ways,” said Katherine Giroux-Bougard, national chairperson for the Canadian Federation of Students.
She said there’s been a lot of speculation in the past few years about the future of the Post-Secondary Student Support Program, the existing funding program for aboriginal students.
But, Giroux-Bougard cautioned, the government may alter the current structure for dissemination of funds. If it’s rolled into the existing programs, the funding risks being divided between loans for aboriginal students and the regular application program.

Feds reinstate limited research funding

The government dedicated a significant funding to college and university research: an extra $32 million will be funneled into Canada’s research granting councils annually, starting in 2010-11.
“I think the fact that we’re one of the rare sectors who managed to get some funding 8212; an increase of funds in this federal budget 8212; I think it’s a good situation for universities in general and for the research community,” said Lyse Huot, director of government relations and communications for the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada.
The annual $32 million will see $16 million for the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, $13 million for the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and $3 million for the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council.
Several groups, such as the Canadian Association of University Teachers, were concerned that the 2010 budget’s allocation was not sufficient following recent cuts to research funding.
“We were hoping after their disastrous mistake last year 8212; where they cut the funding for the three granting councils by $147.9 million 8212; that they would recognize that error and really re-calibrate things,” said CAUT executive director James Turk, who noted the grant is less than the rate of inflation.

For some, including NDP MP Niki Ashton, the party’s post-secondary education critic, the idea of private-sector partnerships and commercialization in research raised more concern than celebration. “When you’re not funding research properly through research councils and through post-secondary institutions, this commercial agenda and this agenda toward research that’s profitable is the outlet that researchers might have to go into, given that they’re not getting enough support,” she said
Additional research-related funding was earmarked for the establishment of a new post-doctoral fellowships program in cooperation with the granting councils. The allotment of $45 million over five years will aim to “attract top-level talent to Canada” in the form of up to 140 fellowships that will offer $70,000 per year over two years.

$30m One-year internship for youths

$20m to help high school students make it to university and college

$32m for national research councils

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Tories reinstate some research funding, offer limited post-secondary education support

OTTAWA (CUP) 8212; While its title was “Leading the Way on Jobs and Growth,” the Conservatives’ March 4 federal budget offered little for students seeking such prosperity in the near future.
The biggest announcement in the over 400-page document offered $19 billion in stimulus funding to complete the Tories’ Economic Action Plan. The two-year program launched in the 2009 budget has supported post-secondary education in the form of a $2 billion Knowledge Infrastructure Program announced last year 8212; an initiative that many universities and colleges still have yet to benefit from. The majority of that targeted spending is set to end in March 2011.
Finance Minister Jim Flaherty explained the winding down of stimulus spending will help cut the annual deficit 8212; projected to be $53.8 billion this year 8212; nearly in half by 2012.
In order to reach smaller deficits without tax raises, however, cuts in government spending had to be made.
“This is a tough budget . . . Some very difficult decisions have been made,” Flaherty told reporters prior to his speech in the House of Commons. “Most of the answers to requests for funding were “No.'”

Employment support present, educational support lacking

Alongside announcements for some general job-creation and job-protection measures, the Conservatives offered limited funding to help Canadian students find work 8212; including a one-year increase of $30 million for youth internships, set to take effect this year.
“Thirty million dollars, I think, is a great investment in a career-focus aspect. . . . I think this will help in terms of getting students into the workforce, but the issue is that about five years after a recession is when student jobs start to come back,” said Arati Sharma, Canadian Alliance of Student Associations national director. “So $30 million is a first step, but it’s going to take a long time for students to get back into the workforce.”
Another $30 million was earmarked for programs aimed at helping young immigrants, Aboriginal Canadians and single parents gain work experience. Accessibility to post-secondary education was the goal in giving $20 million to help high school students make it to university and college through the Pathways to Education Canada program.

The most significant, yet lacking-in-detail mention of educational support was in a vague “new approach” the government plans to take in terms of post-secondary education funding for Aboriginal students, which will be “co-ordinated with other federal student support programs.”
“It was kind of a non-announcement in a lot of ways,” said Katherine Giroux-Bougard, national chairperson for the Canadian Federation of Students.
She said there’s been a lot of speculation in the past few years about the future of the Post-Secondary Student Support Program, the existing funding program for aboriginal students.
But, Giroux-Bougard cautioned, the government may alter the current structure for dissemination of funds. If it’s rolled into the existing programs, the funding risks being divided between loans for aboriginal students and the regular application program.

Feds reinstate limited research funding

The government dedicated a significant funding to college and university research: an extra $32 million will be funneled into Canada’s research granting councils annually, starting in 2010-11.
“I think the fact that we’re one of the rare sectors who managed to get some funding 8212; an increase of funds in this federal budget 8212; I think it’s a good situation for universities in general and for the research community,” said Lyse Huot, director of government relations and communications for the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada.
The annual $32 million will see $16 million for the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, $13 million for the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and $3 million for the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council.
Several groups, such as the Canadian Association of University Teachers, were concerned that the 2010 budget’s allocation was not sufficient following recent cuts to research funding.
“We were hoping after their disastrous mistake last year 8212; where they cut the funding for the three granting councils by $147.9 million 8212; that they would recognize that error and really re-calibrate things,” said CAUT executive director James Turk, who noted the grant is less than the rate of inflation.

For some, including NDP MP Niki Ashton, the party’s post-secondary education critic, the idea of private-sector partnerships and commercialization in research raised more concern than celebration. “When you’re not funding research properly through research councils and through post-secondary institutions, this commercial agenda and this agenda toward research that’s profitable is the outlet that researchers might have to go into, given that they’re not getting enough support,” she said
Additional research-related funding was earmarked for the establishment of a new post-doctoral fellowships program in cooperation with the granting councils. The allotment of $45 million over five years will aim to “attract top-level talent to Canada” in the form of up to 140 fellowships that will offer $70,000 per year over two years.

$30m One-year internship for youths

$20m to help high school students make it to university and college

$32m for national research councils

Leave a Comment