Home City in brief: Sept. 7, 2010

City in brief: Sept. 7, 2010

by admin September 7, 2010

City in brief: Sept. 7, 2010

by admin September 7, 2010

New frosh theme: offending people

The executive of McGill’s Management Undergraduate Society scrapped their frosh’s tribal theme days before the event was to begin amid charges that the theme was offensive and culturally insensitive (ironic considering McGill’s men’s sports teams are the Redmen?). The McGill Daily reported that a promotional video showing students in face paint and costumes representing the Zulu, Maasai, Inca and Maori “tribes’ drew negative attention to the theme. The video was pulled, and has raised suggestions that the administration begin weighing in on the frosh planning process. In the meantime, MUS picked a new theme: superheroes. Coincidentally, it’s the same theme the CSU picked for Concordia’s orientation this year. We take offense.

Can’t get enough of that doo, doo, doo

The Société de transport de Montréal announced on its Mouvement Collectif blog in early August that the famous “doo doo doo” sound has returned to the metro. The well-known little ditty is being tested on a train on the orange line, and now sounds to signal when a door is closing. The three note jingle was not actually composed by human intuition, but was produced by a power converter on the MR-73 trains. The only chance of you hearing the sound is if you can catch the only nine-car train playing the tune as it travels along the orange line. But the STM warned that the chances of actually riding this car are pretty low. Beat the odds.

Easier wireless coming your way

If you are the proud owner of a Microsoft Windows-based device, like a laptop, as of Sept. 7, you no longer need third-party software SecureW2 to log into Concordia’s wireless network. Head to www.wireless.concordia.ca for instructions for on accessing the wireless network. According to the university website, the changes to the wireless network “were undertaken primarily to make it easier for students, faculty and staff to set up their devices for use at Concordia.” Now students will never have to step foot in the library…

Concordia lets go of teacher who wanted to pay for As

In apparent defiance of logic, Concordia University refused a professor’s offer to work for free. The Montreal Gazette’s university affairs reporter Peggy Curran reported Sept. 6 that Concordia police science lecturer Paris Arnopolous had offered to teach a class or two for free. When he retired in 1996, he offered to teach while his salary would go to an endowment fund in his name to grant scholarships to students. This worked until 1998, when Arnopolous was told to join the part-time teaching faculty association which he declined. He was later brought back to teach a seminar class for one semester but Arnopolous, an admitted “maverick”, decided that students would get a rebate for his class depending on how well they did, like double their money for an A. He wasn’t asked back. Concordia reported it had a problem with the ethical ramifications of one person offering students money while also grading them.

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New frosh theme: offending people

The executive of McGill’s Management Undergraduate Society scrapped their frosh’s tribal theme days before the event was to begin amid charges that the theme was offensive and culturally insensitive (ironic considering McGill’s men’s sports teams are the Redmen?). The McGill Daily reported that a promotional video showing students in face paint and costumes representing the Zulu, Maasai, Inca and Maori “tribes’ drew negative attention to the theme. The video was pulled, and has raised suggestions that the administration begin weighing in on the frosh planning process. In the meantime, MUS picked a new theme: superheroes. Coincidentally, it’s the same theme the CSU picked for Concordia’s orientation this year. We take offense.

Can’t get enough of that doo, doo, doo

The Société de transport de Montréal announced on its Mouvement Collectif blog in early August that the famous “doo doo doo” sound has returned to the metro. The well-known little ditty is being tested on a train on the orange line, and now sounds to signal when a door is closing. The three note jingle was not actually composed by human intuition, but was produced by a power converter on the MR-73 trains. The only chance of you hearing the sound is if you can catch the only nine-car train playing the tune as it travels along the orange line. But the STM warned that the chances of actually riding this car are pretty low. Beat the odds.

Easier wireless coming your way

If you are the proud owner of a Microsoft Windows-based device, like a laptop, as of Sept. 7, you no longer need third-party software SecureW2 to log into Concordia’s wireless network. Head to www.wireless.concordia.ca for instructions for on accessing the wireless network. According to the university website, the changes to the wireless network “were undertaken primarily to make it easier for students, faculty and staff to set up their devices for use at Concordia.” Now students will never have to step foot in the library…

Concordia lets go of teacher who wanted to pay for As

In apparent defiance of logic, Concordia University refused a professor’s offer to work for free. The Montreal Gazette’s university affairs reporter Peggy Curran reported Sept. 6 that Concordia police science lecturer Paris Arnopolous had offered to teach a class or two for free. When he retired in 1996, he offered to teach while his salary would go to an endowment fund in his name to grant scholarships to students. This worked until 1998, when Arnopolous was told to join the part-time teaching faculty association which he declined. He was later brought back to teach a seminar class for one semester but Arnopolous, an admitted “maverick”, decided that students would get a rebate for his class depending on how well they did, like double their money for an A. He wasn’t asked back. Concordia reported it had a problem with the ethical ramifications of one person offering students money while also grading them.

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