Home One step at a time: Concordia set to repair escalators

One step at a time: Concordia set to repair escalators

by admin September 21, 2010

One step at a time: Concordia set to repair escalators

by admin September 21, 2010

Nearly every Concordia student has at least one story, or rant, about their experiences riding the painfully unreliable escalators in the Hall building. The good news is, these stories might soon become memories, as Concordia recently announced that the escalators will finally be repaired.

The project is still in its tendering phase, with construction bids from various companies rolling in until the Sept. 29 deadline.

But for many students who attend the majority of their classes in the Hall building, and therefore encounter the escalators on a daily basis, the university’s announcement comes as a complete relief.

Less than a week after the announcement, political science student Avinash Razack experienced firsthand the reason the repairs are so necessary. “This morning I was exhausted and I look up and I see that the escalators are not even working,” Razack said. “I have class on the ninth floor and at least five or six escalators weren’t working so it was quite trying to get to class.”

Razack added that the broken escalators have almost become a yearly tradition. “It’s funny but it’s not that funny at the same time. If you’re paying so much money for tuition fees you expect the little things to work,” he said.

The notion of tradition also struck a chord with Concordia alumni Alexandra Henderson, who noted on Facebook “I graduated in 1995, and I swear to you, they weren’t working then.”

A Facebook group called “Argh, Stupid Concordia Escalators!” was even created over four years ago to allow students to share their stories and vent out their frustrations.

Despite the university’s announcement, other students remain sceptical of the actual likelihood of these repairs. “It’s just like the Champlain Bridge,” said English literature student Abdur-Rahman Hussain. “They always say they’re going to fix it but it never ends up happening so I’ll believe it when I see it, when I can go to class without having to use stairs.”

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Nearly every Concordia student has at least one story, or rant, about their experiences riding the painfully unreliable escalators in the Hall building. The good news is, these stories might soon become memories, as Concordia recently announced that the escalators will finally be repaired.

The project is still in its tendering phase, with construction bids from various companies rolling in until the Sept. 29 deadline.

But for many students who attend the majority of their classes in the Hall building, and therefore encounter the escalators on a daily basis, the university’s announcement comes as a complete relief.

Less than a week after the announcement, political science student Avinash Razack experienced firsthand the reason the repairs are so necessary. “This morning I was exhausted and I look up and I see that the escalators are not even working,” Razack said. “I have class on the ninth floor and at least five or six escalators weren’t working so it was quite trying to get to class.”

Razack added that the broken escalators have almost become a yearly tradition. “It’s funny but it’s not that funny at the same time. If you’re paying so much money for tuition fees you expect the little things to work,” he said.

The notion of tradition also struck a chord with Concordia alumni Alexandra Henderson, who noted on Facebook “I graduated in 1995, and I swear to you, they weren’t working then.”

A Facebook group called “Argh, Stupid Concordia Escalators!” was even created over four years ago to allow students to share their stories and vent out their frustrations.

Despite the university’s announcement, other students remain sceptical of the actual likelihood of these repairs. “It’s just like the Champlain Bridge,” said English literature student Abdur-Rahman Hussain. “They always say they’re going to fix it but it never ends up happening so I’ll believe it when I see it, when I can go to class without having to use stairs.”

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