Home Sustainable Concordia takes tougher stance on board members

Sustainable Concordia takes tougher stance on board members

by admin October 3, 2010

Sustainable Concordia takes tougher stance on board members

by admin October 3, 2010

Sustainable Concordia’s annual general meeting last Thursday resulted in several changes to the organization’s constitution, which now pushes a little more involvement from the individuals sitting on its board of directors.

Notably, electorates who miss two consecutive meetings without giving adequate notification will be considered “resigned,” and this clause will also be enforced during summer months.

“The article relating to absenteeism, in this context, is an attempt to express the importance of the summer session for planning and strategic visioning, both key components of BOD responsibilities,” said the organization’s external communications coordinator Pawel Porowski.

According to Sustainable Concordia’s office manager Ghanish Ghoorah, the stricter rules pertaining to the board of directors were actually largely the work of the board itself.

“This is the first time Sustainable Concordia has had a BOD who worked very closely with us, and we learned a lot from the very beneficial collaboration/experience,” Ghoorah wrote in an email. “Hence, the board proposed some changes.”

The changes were largely motivated by difficulties encountered last year, when resignations left only five people sitting on the board, and consequently made maintaining the voting quorum of four difficult to maintain.

“We are very excited about the constitutional changes that were approved by our membership this year,” said Porowski. “The board of directors, which is now celebrating its first full year of activity since Sustainable Concordia’s incorporation in October of 2009, will now enjoy better cohesiveness within the organization and stronger relationships between its members and SC staff.”

Held in the CSU Lounge in the Hall building, the 2010 general meeting saw more than 60 attendees unanimously approve the constitutional amendment concerning the repercussions for board members missing meetings.

The changes are indicative of the organization’s expectation for a heightened level of commitment from its elected members – an expectation that also came through in a second constitutional amendment which requires all paid staff of Sustainable Concordia to prepare a detailed report at the end of each fiscal year.

Ghoorah added that the second modification was made in order to help keep track of achievements and build institutional memory, as well as to help “train new staff and produce a more accurate bi-annual SC report.”

Apart from constitutional amendments, this year’s general meeting was also the forum for members of the organization, which is student fee levy,s to approve the budget for the upcoming year. Twelve people from three different categories were also elected during the meeting to sit on the organization’s board: six undergraduate representatives, three staff and faculty representatives and three honorary members.

Despite some constitutional changes, the organization remained committed to its mandate. Amidst much talk from members of the organization about the significance of living in a sustainable and responsible manner, both on an individual level and within the school sphere, Philippe Colas, a professor at the John Molson School of Business who was involved in the creation of Sustainable Concordia, looked towards the future of sustainability in the university with his address to the room.

“I think sustainability needs cross-fertilization between different faculties,” Colas said. “I dream one day of having a minor in sustainability available at Concordia, which would include having our students learn with all different fields including management … marketing, as well as philosophy and geography.”

Leave a Comment

Sustainable Concordia’s annual general meeting last Thursday resulted in several changes to the organization’s constitution, which now pushes a little more involvement from the individuals sitting on its board of directors.

Notably, electorates who miss two consecutive meetings without giving adequate notification will be considered “resigned,” and this clause will also be enforced during summer months.

“The article relating to absenteeism, in this context, is an attempt to express the importance of the summer session for planning and strategic visioning, both key components of BOD responsibilities,” said the organization’s external communications coordinator Pawel Porowski.

According to Sustainable Concordia’s office manager Ghanish Ghoorah, the stricter rules pertaining to the board of directors were actually largely the work of the board itself.

“This is the first time Sustainable Concordia has had a BOD who worked very closely with us, and we learned a lot from the very beneficial collaboration/experience,” Ghoorah wrote in an email. “Hence, the board proposed some changes.”

The changes were largely motivated by difficulties encountered last year, when resignations left only five people sitting on the board, and consequently made maintaining the voting quorum of four difficult to maintain.

“We are very excited about the constitutional changes that were approved by our membership this year,” said Porowski. “The board of directors, which is now celebrating its first full year of activity since Sustainable Concordia’s incorporation in October of 2009, will now enjoy better cohesiveness within the organization and stronger relationships between its members and SC staff.”

Held in the CSU Lounge in the Hall building, the 2010 general meeting saw more than 60 attendees unanimously approve the constitutional amendment concerning the repercussions for board members missing meetings.

The changes are indicative of the organization’s expectation for a heightened level of commitment from its elected members – an expectation that also came through in a second constitutional amendment which requires all paid staff of Sustainable Concordia to prepare a detailed report at the end of each fiscal year.

Ghoorah added that the second modification was made in order to help keep track of achievements and build institutional memory, as well as to help “train new staff and produce a more accurate bi-annual SC report.”

Apart from constitutional amendments, this year’s general meeting was also the forum for members of the organization, which is student fee levy,s to approve the budget for the upcoming year. Twelve people from three different categories were also elected during the meeting to sit on the organization’s board: six undergraduate representatives, three staff and faculty representatives and three honorary members.

Despite some constitutional changes, the organization remained committed to its mandate. Amidst much talk from members of the organization about the significance of living in a sustainable and responsible manner, both on an individual level and within the school sphere, Philippe Colas, a professor at the John Molson School of Business who was involved in the creation of Sustainable Concordia, looked towards the future of sustainability in the university with his address to the room.

“I think sustainability needs cross-fertilization between different faculties,” Colas said. “I dream one day of having a minor in sustainability available at Concordia, which would include having our students learn with all different fields including management … marketing, as well as philosophy and geography.”

Leave a Comment