Home City in brief: Nov. 2, 2010

City in brief: Nov. 2, 2010

by admin November 2, 2010

City in brief: Nov. 2, 2010

by admin November 2, 2010

Graffiti artists likely did not hear train coming

Three young men were killed early Sunday morning when they were struck by a Via Rail passenger train that likely did not hear or see the train coming, according to Montreal police. Five young men between the ages of 17 and 19 were on the tracks in an area popular among graffiti artists below the Turcot interchange. The concrete structure of the interchange possibly muffled the sound of the train. The police are weighing trespassing and mischief charges against the surviving two men, who were narrowly missed by the train and were treated for shock. Sterling Downey, founder of Under Pressure, Montreal’s International Graffiti Festival, told media that one of the deceased was well-known in the local community for his recent work.

Bergeron threatens resignation over the Turcot

Projet Montréal leader Richard Bergeron announced on Saturday that if the city doesn’t improve their plans for the new Turcot interchange, he’ll be leaving his seat on the executive committee. The announcement came during Projet Montréal’s general meeting last Saturday, Rue Frontenac reported. One of 14 of the city’s executives, Bergeron, who is in charge of urbanism, said that he’ll resign unless the city returns to an alternative proposal, which would see the construction of a new circular interchange with preferential lanes for public transit, as well as an attached tramway to reduce traffic.

Giggle or guffaw? Laughter contest hits MTL

Ten contestants brought their best laugh to Montreal last week for the annual Grand Laughing Championship. Filmed for a documentary dubbed Rire Extreme, the competition will eventually be shown on local channel Canal D, making it the first contest of that kind to be televised, the CBC reported. The championship was created by filmmaker Albert Nerenberg, who said that laughter is healthy, good for both the heart and immune system. Appropriately, nursing home worker Nicole Veillette, of Ste. Eustache, walked away with the title of Quebec’s best laugh.

Brother… I mean, St. André, celebrated at Big O

A Rue Frontenac reporter mused that while Quebec churches are deserted, 30,000 people came out to the Olympic Stadium on Saturday afternoon to celebrate the life of Brother André, the newest addition to the Catholic Church’s roster of saints and Canada’s first male saint as of Oct. 17. Cardinal Jean-Claude Turcotte presided over a two-hour mass. A sliver of Brother André’s heart and the suitcase he toted on visits were among objects brought forward. Police pegged total attendance at 30,000, while 42,000 tickets were purchased beforehand at $5. Politicians like Premier Jean Charest, Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Mayor Gérald Tremblay joined 58 Canadian bishops in the festivities. Merchants were selling souvenir merchandise fit for a music concert: t-shirts, wooden crucifixes, key chains, and candles.

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Graffiti artists likely did not hear train coming

Three young men were killed early Sunday morning when they were struck by a Via Rail passenger train that likely did not hear or see the train coming, according to Montreal police. Five young men between the ages of 17 and 19 were on the tracks in an area popular among graffiti artists below the Turcot interchange. The concrete structure of the interchange possibly muffled the sound of the train. The police are weighing trespassing and mischief charges against the surviving two men, who were narrowly missed by the train and were treated for shock. Sterling Downey, founder of Under Pressure, Montreal’s International Graffiti Festival, told media that one of the deceased was well-known in the local community for his recent work.

Bergeron threatens resignation over the Turcot

Projet Montréal leader Richard Bergeron announced on Saturday that if the city doesn’t improve their plans for the new Turcot interchange, he’ll be leaving his seat on the executive committee. The announcement came during Projet Montréal’s general meeting last Saturday, Rue Frontenac reported. One of 14 of the city’s executives, Bergeron, who is in charge of urbanism, said that he’ll resign unless the city returns to an alternative proposal, which would see the construction of a new circular interchange with preferential lanes for public transit, as well as an attached tramway to reduce traffic.

Giggle or guffaw? Laughter contest hits MTL

Ten contestants brought their best laugh to Montreal last week for the annual Grand Laughing Championship. Filmed for a documentary dubbed Rire Extreme, the competition will eventually be shown on local channel Canal D, making it the first contest of that kind to be televised, the CBC reported. The championship was created by filmmaker Albert Nerenberg, who said that laughter is healthy, good for both the heart and immune system. Appropriately, nursing home worker Nicole Veillette, of Ste. Eustache, walked away with the title of Quebec’s best laugh.

Brother… I mean, St. André, celebrated at Big O

A Rue Frontenac reporter mused that while Quebec churches are deserted, 30,000 people came out to the Olympic Stadium on Saturday afternoon to celebrate the life of Brother André, the newest addition to the Catholic Church’s roster of saints and Canada’s first male saint as of Oct. 17. Cardinal Jean-Claude Turcotte presided over a two-hour mass. A sliver of Brother André’s heart and the suitcase he toted on visits were among objects brought forward. Police pegged total attendance at 30,000, while 42,000 tickets were purchased beforehand at $5. Politicians like Premier Jean Charest, Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Mayor Gérald Tremblay joined 58 Canadian bishops in the festivities. Merchants were selling souvenir merchandise fit for a music concert: t-shirts, wooden crucifixes, key chains, and candles.

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