Home City in brief: Nov. 9, 2010

City in brief: Nov. 9, 2010

by admin November 9, 2010

City in brief: Nov. 9, 2010

by admin November 9, 2010

Bergeron asked to resign from exec. over Turcot

Projet Montréal leader Richard Bergeron followed through on his threat and resigned from his post on the city’s executive committee last Thursday, but only after the mayor asked him to step down. Bergeron, who was in charge of urban development, said that he felt he was placed in an unfair position by mayor Gérald Tremblay over the issue of the Turcot Interchange. A week earlier, the former said if the city didn’t improve the Turcot plans proposed by the province, which he had not even been allowed to see, he would resign from his seat. On Thursday afternoon, Tremblay reportedly asked for Bergeron’s full support, which he declined, prompting the mayor to request he leave the executive. Transports Québec will be announcing the newest plans for the interchange today.

Potential Richler street draws sovereigntist flack

Montreal may have been the home of literary icon Mordecai Richler, but a few Quebec nationalist groups aren’t so inclined for it to be the home of a street by the same name. After recent proposals to rename some sort of public space after Richler have been picking up steam, the Société Saint-Jean-Baptiste has expressed opposition to the idea, on the grounds that the author was an “anti-Quebec racist,” the Canadian Press reported. A sovereigntist student group at UdeM expressed similar opposition. Richler had contributed to many publications during his career in which he expressed critical views of the sovereigntist movement and certain events in the province’s history.

Policeman suspended over breach of ethics

According to a news release from the Centre of Research Action on Race Relations, the Quebec Police Ethics Committee has suspended a Montreal officer in response to his actions which violated the rights of a young black man in 2008. Jonathan Roy was walking by then 21-year-old Kenny Hopkinson who he claims then called him a “piece of shit” to his friend on the phone. He proceeded to pepper spray, hit and arrest Hopkinson. Roy will be suspended for 23 days without pay after being found guilty of five police ethics breaches, including intimidation and unjustified use of physical force. The release also states that the case is still being investigated by the Quebec Human Rights and Youth Rights Commission.

CUTV, CSU to present joint motion

After a proposal to have CUTV film Concordia Student Union council meetings was greeted harshly by many councillors and the executive in October, the two organizations will be presenting a joint motion at this month’s meeting on Wednesday. In the resolution, it states that CUTV will be invited to film the January council meeting as a “pilot project.” The organizations will then meet to discuss guidelines, which could be presented to the councillors for a vote in March. This resolution already specifies that CUTV cannot film individuals uninvolved in a debate, nor focus on the vote of one individual rather than the entire group of voters.

Bergeron asked to resign from exec. over Turcot

Projet Montréal leader Richard Bergeron followed through on his threat and resigned from his post on the city’s executive committee last Thursday, but only after the mayor asked him to step down. Bergeron, who was in charge of urban development, said that he felt he was placed in an unfair position by mayor Gérald Tremblay over the issue of the Turcot Interchange. A week earlier, the former said if the city didn’t improve the Turcot plans proposed by the province, which he had not even been allowed to see, he would resign from his seat. On Thursday afternoon, Tremblay reportedly asked for Bergeron’s full support, which he declined, prompting the mayor to request he leave the executive. Transports Québec will be announcing the newest plans for the interchange today.

Potential Richler street draws sovereigntist flack

Montreal may have been the home of literary icon Mordecai Richler, but a few Quebec nationalist groups aren’t so inclined for it to be the home of a street by the same name. After recent proposals to rename some sort of public space after Richler have been picking up steam, the Société Saint-Jean-Baptiste has expressed opposition to the idea, on the grounds that the author was an “anti-Quebec racist,” the Canadian Press reported. A sovereigntist student group at UdeM expressed similar opposition. Richler had contributed to many publications during his career in which he expressed critical views of the sovereigntist movement and certain events in the province’s history.

Policeman suspended over breach of ethics

According to a news release from the Centre of Research Action on Race Relations, the Quebec Police Ethics Committee has suspended a Montreal officer in response to his actions which violated the rights of a young black man in 2008. Jonathan Roy was walking by then 21-year-old Kenny Hopkinson who he claims then called him a “piece of shit” to his friend on the phone. He proceeded to pepper spray, hit and arrest Hopkinson. Roy will be suspended for 23 days without pay after being found guilty of five police ethics breaches, including intimidation and unjustified use of physical force. The release also states that the case is still being investigated by the Quebec Human Rights and Youth Rights Commission.

CUTV, CSU to present joint motion

After a proposal to have CUTV film Concordia Student Union council meetings was greeted harshly by many councillors and the executive in October, the two organizations will be presenting a joint motion at this month’s meeting on Wednesday. In the resolution, it states that CUTV will be invited to film the January council meeting as a “pilot project.” The organizations will then meet to discuss guidelines, which could be presented to the councillors for a vote in March. This resolution already specifies that CUTV cannot film individuals uninvolved in a debate, nor focus on the vote of one individual rather than the entire group of voters.