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German breakdance crew too hot to Handel

by admin November 30, 2010

German breakdance crew too hot to Handel

by admin November 30, 2010

Organized as part of the Montreal Bach Festival, the premiere of Red Bull Flying Bach at the Saint James United Church on Sunday night was a success. By setting their breakdancing to the music of classic composer and musician Johann Sebastian Bach, Germany’s famous Flying Steps b-boy crew attracted and seduced an audience composed of all demographics. The room was filled with university students, adults, children and grandparents.

Although the show has been performed in Berlin, this was its premiere in North America. As a cultural crossroads between North America and Europe, Montreal seemed the perfect choice to experiment with the clash of classical and urban cultures.

The dance troupe consisted of one woman and eight men, supported by two pianists and one organist. The music smoothly incorporated Bach’s music with hip-hop elements. There was no dialogue, but a clear narrative developed over the course of the show: the men vied for the affection of the woman while the forces of classical and urban movement struggled to conserve and promote their values.

Projected video, images, and dynamic lighting enhanced the church setting, making it even more breathtaking. One projection was directed toward a white sail held by the team of Flying Steps performers and played some black-and-white clips of slow-motion breakdance moves. The other one was a giant projection of green digitalized faces onto the organ at the back of the church. In addition to the astounding quality of the moves, the troupe also interacted with the audience by faking some jumps on the spectators at the corners of the stage.

Flying Steps managed to relate the two different musical styles with humour, elegance and above all, energy.

At first, energy was at first what seemed to be the only link connecting the show with its main organizer, Red Bull Canada.

“Red Bull really wants to help organize fun events for people, and this is not limited to extreme sports contests” said student Derek Brenzel, the energy drink’s Student Brand Manager for Concordia.

Montreal’s fourth Bach festival started last week, and will continue to feature other concerts to celebrate Bach’s 325th birthday, including a performance of works by Bach, Brahms and Bruckner by the Montreal Symphony Orchestra and and his masterpiece, “The Goldberg Variations,” arranged by Catrin Finch, considered to be “queen of the harp.” Prices for students are less than half the regular price for most concerts.

Red Bull Flying Bach’s last show is Nov. 30. The Bach Festival runs until Dec. 8. For more information, check out www.festivalbachmontreal.com

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Organized as part of the Montreal Bach Festival, the premiere of Red Bull Flying Bach at the Saint James United Church on Sunday night was a success. By setting their breakdancing to the music of classic composer and musician Johann Sebastian Bach, Germany’s famous Flying Steps b-boy crew attracted and seduced an audience composed of all demographics. The room was filled with university students, adults, children and grandparents.

Although the show has been performed in Berlin, this was its premiere in North America. As a cultural crossroads between North America and Europe, Montreal seemed the perfect choice to experiment with the clash of classical and urban cultures.

The dance troupe consisted of one woman and eight men, supported by two pianists and one organist. The music smoothly incorporated Bach’s music with hip-hop elements. There was no dialogue, but a clear narrative developed over the course of the show: the men vied for the affection of the woman while the forces of classical and urban movement struggled to conserve and promote their values.

Projected video, images, and dynamic lighting enhanced the church setting, making it even more breathtaking. One projection was directed toward a white sail held by the team of Flying Steps performers and played some black-and-white clips of slow-motion breakdance moves. The other one was a giant projection of green digitalized faces onto the organ at the back of the church. In addition to the astounding quality of the moves, the troupe also interacted with the audience by faking some jumps on the spectators at the corners of the stage.

Flying Steps managed to relate the two different musical styles with humour, elegance and above all, energy.

At first, energy was at first what seemed to be the only link connecting the show with its main organizer, Red Bull Canada.

“Red Bull really wants to help organize fun events for people, and this is not limited to extreme sports contests” said student Derek Brenzel, the energy drink’s Student Brand Manager for Concordia.

Montreal’s fourth Bach festival started last week, and will continue to feature other concerts to celebrate Bach’s 325th birthday, including a performance of works by Bach, Brahms and Bruckner by the Montreal Symphony Orchestra and and his masterpiece, “The Goldberg Variations,” arranged by Catrin Finch, considered to be “queen of the harp.” Prices for students are less than half the regular price for most concerts.

Red Bull Flying Bach’s last show is Nov. 30. The Bach Festival runs until Dec. 8. For more information, check out www.festivalbachmontreal.com

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