Home Indie-pop tunes with a grunge-punk attitude

Indie-pop tunes with a grunge-punk attitude

by admin November 30, 2010

Indie-pop tunes with a grunge-punk attitude

by admin November 30, 2010

It’s refreshing to meet a band who doesn’t appear to take itself too seriously. Sporting wily grins and brimming with sarcasm, singer/guitarist Alex Cooper and singer/guitarist/keyboardist Louis Jackson of Parlovr artfully recreated the heartwarming series of events which gave birth to the Montreal trio.

Cooper and Jackson used to play in a pop-punk band back in the day, but it disintegrated and they lost touch. In 2006, they happily, albeit accidentally, reunited at a show and, after a nifty celebration which included broken beer bottles, smashed instruments and black eyes, the two moved into a loft they named “The Parlour.”

“We needed a business as a front to be able to live there because it was a commercial loft,” Cooper explained between sips from his tallboy of Pabst.

Drummer Jeremy MacCuish joined in 2008 and within a year the group self-released their self-titled debut. The LP was re-released in 2010 on Dine Alone Records, along with a four-track EP entitled Hell/Heaven/Big/Love.

Although some may assume that the spelling of Parlovr was a simple attempt at being trendy and clever, the story is much more complicated. A noise band from Ohio goes by the same name – news that came in the form of a telephone call from the group’s manager to organizers of Under The Sun, a music festival in Montreal that Parlovr was to be playing at. Fans had been delightedly posting all over the Cleveland band’s Myspace page after seeing the Montreal group’s name on the lineup. So to avoid further confusion, Parlour became Parlovr.

Unlike many bands which emerged around the time that they started playing, the three-piece is perfectly content with not following the trend toward multi-member musical collectives. “It was all the same band,” Louis remarked of the music scene at the time. “It just seemed so incestuous and I wasn’t incestuous with anybody because I didn’t know anyone.”

Cooper laughed, adding “I think we kind of missed the idea of just having a three-piece playing rock “n’ roll.” To elaborate on that point, Jackson said: “I’d like to have some strings in some parts, but I wouldn’t have a fucking violinist and a cellist at every show just so that they could play three bars. There’s no need for that.”

The self-proclaimed “sloppy pop band” have long-since bid farewell to their high school days, but it was during that time when their musical tastes reached their full maturity. “When you talk about influences, [they] stop at a certain age,” said Cooper. “You get your main influences and then you don’t really change them after that.”

“We grew up in the “90s, [so] that’s the music we listen to,” Jackson added.

While most bands are in an endless crusade against categorization, Parlovr are more than happy to offer detailed, precise, yet humorous descriptions of their music. They are currently in the process of recording a new album which will hopefully be released in late spring 2011.

According to Cooper, the record could fall under the made-up category of “spacey, surfy, sexy, sloppy pop.” Jackson’s vision was even more imaginative: “If you take an Elvis movie and put it in space and then add a bunch of naked chicks [you’ll get the new album.]” How thrilling!

Having played a series of festivals in the past year including M for Montreal, North By Northeast, South By Southwest, Osheaga, Mini M, CMJ and Pop Montreal, the band will be making their way down to Texas for a tour that will start in January 2011.

Catch Parlovr at Cabaret du Mile End on Dec. 3 at 8 p.m.

It’s refreshing to meet a band who doesn’t appear to take itself too seriously. Sporting wily grins and brimming with sarcasm, singer/guitarist Alex Cooper and singer/guitarist/keyboardist Louis Jackson of Parlovr artfully recreated the heartwarming series of events which gave birth to the Montreal trio.

Cooper and Jackson used to play in a pop-punk band back in the day, but it disintegrated and they lost touch. In 2006, they happily, albeit accidentally, reunited at a show and, after a nifty celebration which included broken beer bottles, smashed instruments and black eyes, the two moved into a loft they named “The Parlour.”

“We needed a business as a front to be able to live there because it was a commercial loft,” Cooper explained between sips from his tallboy of Pabst.

Drummer Jeremy MacCuish joined in 2008 and within a year the group self-released their self-titled debut. The LP was re-released in 2010 on Dine Alone Records, along with a four-track EP entitled Hell/Heaven/Big/Love.

Although some may assume that the spelling of Parlovr was a simple attempt at being trendy and clever, the story is much more complicated. A noise band from Ohio goes by the same name – news that came in the form of a telephone call from the group’s manager to organizers of Under The Sun, a music festival in Montreal that Parlovr was to be playing at. Fans had been delightedly posting all over the Cleveland band’s Myspace page after seeing the Montreal group’s name on the lineup. So to avoid further confusion, Parlour became Parlovr.

Unlike many bands which emerged around the time that they started playing, the three-piece is perfectly content with not following the trend toward multi-member musical collectives. “It was all the same band,” Louis remarked of the music scene at the time. “It just seemed so incestuous and I wasn’t incestuous with anybody because I didn’t know anyone.”

Cooper laughed, adding “I think we kind of missed the idea of just having a three-piece playing rock “n’ roll.” To elaborate on that point, Jackson said: “I’d like to have some strings in some parts, but I wouldn’t have a fucking violinist and a cellist at every show just so that they could play three bars. There’s no need for that.”

The self-proclaimed “sloppy pop band” have long-since bid farewell to their high school days, but it was during that time when their musical tastes reached their full maturity. “When you talk about influences, [they] stop at a certain age,” said Cooper. “You get your main influences and then you don’t really change them after that.”

“We grew up in the “90s, [so] that’s the music we listen to,” Jackson added.

While most bands are in an endless crusade against categorization, Parlovr are more than happy to offer detailed, precise, yet humorous descriptions of their music. They are currently in the process of recording a new album which will hopefully be released in late spring 2011.

According to Cooper, the record could fall under the made-up category of “spacey, surfy, sexy, sloppy pop.” Jackson’s vision was even more imaginative: “If you take an Elvis movie and put it in space and then add a bunch of naked chicks [you’ll get the new album.]” How thrilling!

Having played a series of festivals in the past year including M for Montreal, North By Northeast, South By Southwest, Osheaga, Mini M, CMJ and Pop Montreal, the band will be making their way down to Texas for a tour that will start in January 2011.

Catch Parlovr at Cabaret du Mile End on Dec. 3 at 8 p.m.