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Surprising variety of artists at Art M

by admin November 23, 2010

Surprising variety of artists at Art M

by admin November 23, 2010

Since its founding in 1996 Art Mûr Gallery has been bringing together both artists alike and, sometimes, seemingly unsimilar. The latest batch of artists under the spotlight of the Plateau gallery is no different. But Rhéal Olivier Lanthier, the gallery’s director, believes that one of Art Mûr’s most appealing features lies in its diversity.

“We cover older artists like Melvin Charney, emerging artists like Michael Patten and Bevan Ramsay, as well as mid-career artists like Lois Andison and Orest Tataryn,” he explained. Like most galleries, Art Mûr has ample open space, which allows the various pieces to speak for themselves against a simple white wall.

There is everything from more traditional pieces like sculpture, photography and painting, to more modern mediums like neon lights, video installations and 3D printed drawings. Some artists are minimalist or detailed in their work, while others are far more dramatic and abstract.

“You are sure to find something that talks to you,” said Lanthier. Those who visit Art Mûr vary from curious passersbys to connoisseurs looking for the perfect addition to their collection.

Melvin Charney is an internationally recognized and seasoned artist. Des Arbres is Charney’s latest exhibit: a series of snapshot photographs assembled into panoramas. They are photographs of his vacations and document nature at its finest. Charney allows the viewer to see what the lens was unable to capture in one shot.

Born in Stoke, Que., Guillaume Lachapelle lives and practices his art here in Montreal. The Art Mûr gallery is presenting Machinations, Lachapelle’s newest collection, a series of miniature works, which are all incredibly intricate. Machinations allows an up-close examination of various places, focusing on details that would otherwise go unnoticed. His most striking piece is a miniature library, built into the wall of the gallery, which beautifully outlines all the shelves and books of all different sizes. On the exterior of the library is a fire escape which leads nowhere. Not only is Lachapelle’s collection aesthetically pleasing, but it is also thought-provoking as it makes the viewer wonder what Lachapelle is trying to draw our attention to.

Orest Tataryn is a Toronto-based artist who works with neon lights, word play and colors. Thought Sculpture is Tataryn’s newest exhibit, which appeals to those who appreciate edgier and more contemporary works. He explores how text and color can come together in an unusual and artistic manner, making it feel commercial, but still aesthetically appealing. Thought Sculpture is reminiscent of a city’s neon nightlife. Tataryn’s art work can definitely be a conversation piece.

Guylène Lefort’s exhibit “Dualité (Clichés de la mémoire)” will also open at Art Mûr this week on Nov. 25 and deals with the dual concepts of the visible and the invisible.

The current exhibits run until Dec. 18 at 5826 St-Hubert St.

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Since its founding in 1996 Art Mûr Gallery has been bringing together both artists alike and, sometimes, seemingly unsimilar. The latest batch of artists under the spotlight of the Plateau gallery is no different. But Rhéal Olivier Lanthier, the gallery’s director, believes that one of Art Mûr’s most appealing features lies in its diversity.

“We cover older artists like Melvin Charney, emerging artists like Michael Patten and Bevan Ramsay, as well as mid-career artists like Lois Andison and Orest Tataryn,” he explained. Like most galleries, Art Mûr has ample open space, which allows the various pieces to speak for themselves against a simple white wall.

There is everything from more traditional pieces like sculpture, photography and painting, to more modern mediums like neon lights, video installations and 3D printed drawings. Some artists are minimalist or detailed in their work, while others are far more dramatic and abstract.

“You are sure to find something that talks to you,” said Lanthier. Those who visit Art Mûr vary from curious passersbys to connoisseurs looking for the perfect addition to their collection.

Melvin Charney is an internationally recognized and seasoned artist. Des Arbres is Charney’s latest exhibit: a series of snapshot photographs assembled into panoramas. They are photographs of his vacations and document nature at its finest. Charney allows the viewer to see what the lens was unable to capture in one shot.

Born in Stoke, Que., Guillaume Lachapelle lives and practices his art here in Montreal. The Art Mûr gallery is presenting Machinations, Lachapelle’s newest collection, a series of miniature works, which are all incredibly intricate. Machinations allows an up-close examination of various places, focusing on details that would otherwise go unnoticed. His most striking piece is a miniature library, built into the wall of the gallery, which beautifully outlines all the shelves and books of all different sizes. On the exterior of the library is a fire escape which leads nowhere. Not only is Lachapelle’s collection aesthetically pleasing, but it is also thought-provoking as it makes the viewer wonder what Lachapelle is trying to draw our attention to.

Orest Tataryn is a Toronto-based artist who works with neon lights, word play and colors. Thought Sculpture is Tataryn’s newest exhibit, which appeals to those who appreciate edgier and more contemporary works. He explores how text and color can come together in an unusual and artistic manner, making it feel commercial, but still aesthetically appealing. Thought Sculpture is reminiscent of a city’s neon nightlife. Tataryn’s art work can definitely be a conversation piece.

Guylène Lefort’s exhibit “Dualité (Clichés de la mémoire)” will also open at Art Mûr this week on Nov. 25 and deals with the dual concepts of the visible and the invisible.

The current exhibits run until Dec. 18 at 5826 St-Hubert St.

Leave a Comment