Home Designer Drugs set to release own record

Designer Drugs set to release own record

by admin January 11, 2011

Designer Drugs set to release own record

by admin January 11, 2011

Designer Drugs set to release own record

by admin January 11, 2011

Designer Drugs set to release own record

by admin January 11, 2011

Designer Drugs set to release own record

by admin January 11, 2011

Designer Drugs set to release own record

by admin January 11, 2011

VICTORIA (CUP) 8212; Designer Drugs are no strangers to the party scene. The American duo have been DJing to dedicated fans in hot, sweaty clubs since early 2007.

“It gets pretty wild,” admits Michael Vincent Patrick, one half of the duo. “Even though we’re mellow, there’s lots of stage diving and almost slam-dancing. It’s next-level dance-club shit that morphs into that ’90s hardcore punk vibe.”

Although based in New York City, Designer Drugs have gained international fame over the last couple of years. Patrick and fellow band member Theodore Paul Nelson met when they were 16 and bonded over dance music.

In early 2007 they formed Designer Drugs, and have since done over 50 remixes for artists such as Mariah Carey, Little Boots, Hail Social and IAMX, as well as produced four original tracks.

Almost every remix was commissioned by the artist or label, which is rare in the electronic music scene, and is a credit to both their popularity and work ethic.

They have toured extensively as DJs 8212; logging over 300,000 air miles in the last year, according to Patrick. But, between touring and school 8212; Nelson is also a med student 8212; Designer Drugs have found time to put together their first full-length album Hardcore/Softcore scheduled to be released on Feb. 22.

“I actually think we’ve always wanted to do an album, but have got sidetracked doing the remixes. We were getting so many remix requests at the time it was hard to turn down the money,” says Patrick.

Patrick and Nelson share a studio in Philadelphia, but were able to do a lot of the work in their respective home studios, before coming together for analog processing and mastering.

“I think some of the tracks are two years old,” says Patrick. “The problem with the album is we weren’t sure what direction it was going in, so we wrote probably 100 songs and then picked the songs that seemed most relevant and worked best together.”

Fans can expect the album to be varied but cohesive. Patrick says the album is also harder and darker than some of their remixes.

“The first track features Justin Pearson of All Leather and has him screaming over some nasty bass lines,” says Patrick. “But we also have a spaced-out, Dutch house-esque, hip-hop tracks featuring Cerebral Vortex and a grunge-rock-inspired track featuring Annie, the Swedish pop star. It’s a wide variety of styles, but musically and aesthetically it’s all compatible.”

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VICTORIA (CUP) 8212; Designer Drugs are no strangers to the party scene. The American duo have been DJing to dedicated fans in hot, sweaty clubs since early 2007.

“It gets pretty wild,” admits Michael Vincent Patrick, one half of the duo. “Even though we’re mellow, there’s lots of stage diving and almost slam-dancing. It’s next-level dance-club shit that morphs into that ’90s hardcore punk vibe.”

Although based in New York City, Designer Drugs have gained international fame over the last couple of years. Patrick and fellow band member Theodore Paul Nelson met when they were 16 and bonded over dance music.

In early 2007 they formed Designer Drugs, and have since done over 50 remixes for artists such as Mariah Carey, Little Boots, Hail Social and IAMX, as well as produced four original tracks.

Almost every remix was commissioned by the artist or label, which is rare in the electronic music scene, and is a credit to both their popularity and work ethic.

They have toured extensively as DJs 8212; logging over 300,000 air miles in the last year, according to Patrick. But, between touring and school 8212; Nelson is also a med student 8212; Designer Drugs have found time to put together their first full-length album Hardcore/Softcore scheduled to be released on Feb. 22.

“I actually think we’ve always wanted to do an album, but have got sidetracked doing the remixes. We were getting so many remix requests at the time it was hard to turn down the money,” says Patrick.

Patrick and Nelson share a studio in Philadelphia, but were able to do a lot of the work in their respective home studios, before coming together for analog processing and mastering.

“I think some of the tracks are two years old,” says Patrick. “The problem with the album is we weren’t sure what direction it was going in, so we wrote probably 100 songs and then picked the songs that seemed most relevant and worked best together.”

Fans can expect the album to be varied but cohesive. Patrick says the album is also harder and darker than some of their remixes.

“The first track features Justin Pearson of All Leather and has him screaming over some nasty bass lines,” says Patrick. “But we also have a spaced-out, Dutch house-esque, hip-hop tracks featuring Cerebral Vortex and a grunge-rock-inspired track featuring Annie, the Swedish pop star. It’s a wide variety of styles, but musically and aesthetically it’s all compatible.”

Leave a Comment

VICTORIA (CUP) 8212; Designer Drugs are no strangers to the party scene. The American duo have been DJing to dedicated fans in hot, sweaty clubs since early 2007.

“It gets pretty wild,” admits Michael Vincent Patrick, one half of the duo. “Even though we’re mellow, there’s lots of stage diving and almost slam-dancing. It’s next-level dance-club shit that morphs into that ’90s hardcore punk vibe.”

Although based in New York City, Designer Drugs have gained international fame over the last couple of years. Patrick and fellow band member Theodore Paul Nelson met when they were 16 and bonded over dance music.

In early 2007 they formed Designer Drugs, and have since done over 50 remixes for artists such as Mariah Carey, Little Boots, Hail Social and IAMX, as well as produced four original tracks.

Almost every remix was commissioned by the artist or label, which is rare in the electronic music scene, and is a credit to both their popularity and work ethic.

They have toured extensively as DJs 8212; logging over 300,000 air miles in the last year, according to Patrick. But, between touring and school 8212; Nelson is also a med student 8212; Designer Drugs have found time to put together their first full-length album Hardcore/Softcore scheduled to be released on Feb. 22.

“I actually think we’ve always wanted to do an album, but have got sidetracked doing the remixes. We were getting so many remix requests at the time it was hard to turn down the money,” says Patrick.

Patrick and Nelson share a studio in Philadelphia, but were able to do a lot of the work in their respective home studios, before coming together for analog processing and mastering.

“I think some of the tracks are two years old,” says Patrick. “The problem with the album is we weren’t sure what direction it was going in, so we wrote probably 100 songs and then picked the songs that seemed most relevant and worked best together.”

Fans can expect the album to be varied but cohesive. Patrick says the album is also harder and darker than some of their remixes.

“The first track features Justin Pearson of All Leather and has him screaming over some nasty bass lines,” says Patrick. “But we also have a spaced-out, Dutch house-esque, hip-hop tracks featuring Cerebral Vortex and a grunge-rock-inspired track featuring Annie, the Swedish pop star. It’s a wide variety of styles, but musically and aesthetically it’s all compatible.”

Leave a Comment

VICTORIA (CUP) 8212; Designer Drugs are no strangers to the party scene. The American duo have been DJing to dedicated fans in hot, sweaty clubs since early 2007.

“It gets pretty wild,” admits Michael Vincent Patrick, one half of the duo. “Even though we’re mellow, there’s lots of stage diving and almost slam-dancing. It’s next-level dance-club shit that morphs into that ’90s hardcore punk vibe.”

Although based in New York City, Designer Drugs have gained international fame over the last couple of years. Patrick and fellow band member Theodore Paul Nelson met when they were 16 and bonded over dance music.

In early 2007 they formed Designer Drugs, and have since done over 50 remixes for artists such as Mariah Carey, Little Boots, Hail Social and IAMX, as well as produced four original tracks.

Almost every remix was commissioned by the artist or label, which is rare in the electronic music scene, and is a credit to both their popularity and work ethic.

They have toured extensively as DJs 8212; logging over 300,000 air miles in the last year, according to Patrick. But, between touring and school 8212; Nelson is also a med student 8212; Designer Drugs have found time to put together their first full-length album Hardcore/Softcore scheduled to be released on Feb. 22.

“I actually think we’ve always wanted to do an album, but have got sidetracked doing the remixes. We were getting so many remix requests at the time it was hard to turn down the money,” says Patrick.

Patrick and Nelson share a studio in Philadelphia, but were able to do a lot of the work in their respective home studios, before coming together for analog processing and mastering.

“I think some of the tracks are two years old,” says Patrick. “The problem with the album is we weren’t sure what direction it was going in, so we wrote probably 100 songs and then picked the songs that seemed most relevant and worked best together.”

Fans can expect the album to be varied but cohesive. Patrick says the album is also harder and darker than some of their remixes.

“The first track features Justin Pearson of All Leather and has him screaming over some nasty bass lines,” says Patrick. “But we also have a spaced-out, Dutch house-esque, hip-hop tracks featuring Cerebral Vortex and a grunge-rock-inspired track featuring Annie, the Swedish pop star. It’s a wide variety of styles, but musically and aesthetically it’s all compatible.”

Leave a Comment

VICTORIA (CUP) 8212; Designer Drugs are no strangers to the party scene. The American duo have been DJing to dedicated fans in hot, sweaty clubs since early 2007.

“It gets pretty wild,” admits Michael Vincent Patrick, one half of the duo. “Even though we’re mellow, there’s lots of stage diving and almost slam-dancing. It’s next-level dance-club shit that morphs into that ’90s hardcore punk vibe.”

Although based in New York City, Designer Drugs have gained international fame over the last couple of years. Patrick and fellow band member Theodore Paul Nelson met when they were 16 and bonded over dance music.

In early 2007 they formed Designer Drugs, and have since done over 50 remixes for artists such as Mariah Carey, Little Boots, Hail Social and IAMX, as well as produced four original tracks.

Almost every remix was commissioned by the artist or label, which is rare in the electronic music scene, and is a credit to both their popularity and work ethic.

They have toured extensively as DJs 8212; logging over 300,000 air miles in the last year, according to Patrick. But, between touring and school 8212; Nelson is also a med student 8212; Designer Drugs have found time to put together their first full-length album Hardcore/Softcore scheduled to be released on Feb. 22.

“I actually think we’ve always wanted to do an album, but have got sidetracked doing the remixes. We were getting so many remix requests at the time it was hard to turn down the money,” says Patrick.

Patrick and Nelson share a studio in Philadelphia, but were able to do a lot of the work in their respective home studios, before coming together for analog processing and mastering.

“I think some of the tracks are two years old,” says Patrick. “The problem with the album is we weren’t sure what direction it was going in, so we wrote probably 100 songs and then picked the songs that seemed most relevant and worked best together.”

Fans can expect the album to be varied but cohesive. Patrick says the album is also harder and darker than some of their remixes.

“The first track features Justin Pearson of All Leather and has him screaming over some nasty bass lines,” says Patrick. “But we also have a spaced-out, Dutch house-esque, hip-hop tracks featuring Cerebral Vortex and a grunge-rock-inspired track featuring Annie, the Swedish pop star. It’s a wide variety of styles, but musically and aesthetically it’s all compatible.”

Leave a Comment

VICTORIA (CUP) 8212; Designer Drugs are no strangers to the party scene. The American duo have been DJing to dedicated fans in hot, sweaty clubs since early 2007.

“It gets pretty wild,” admits Michael Vincent Patrick, one half of the duo. “Even though we’re mellow, there’s lots of stage diving and almost slam-dancing. It’s next-level dance-club shit that morphs into that ’90s hardcore punk vibe.”

Although based in New York City, Designer Drugs have gained international fame over the last couple of years. Patrick and fellow band member Theodore Paul Nelson met when they were 16 and bonded over dance music.

In early 2007 they formed Designer Drugs, and have since done over 50 remixes for artists such as Mariah Carey, Little Boots, Hail Social and IAMX, as well as produced four original tracks.

Almost every remix was commissioned by the artist or label, which is rare in the electronic music scene, and is a credit to both their popularity and work ethic.

They have toured extensively as DJs 8212; logging over 300,000 air miles in the last year, according to Patrick. But, between touring and school 8212; Nelson is also a med student 8212; Designer Drugs have found time to put together their first full-length album Hardcore/Softcore scheduled to be released on Feb. 22.

“I actually think we’ve always wanted to do an album, but have got sidetracked doing the remixes. We were getting so many remix requests at the time it was hard to turn down the money,” says Patrick.

Patrick and Nelson share a studio in Philadelphia, but were able to do a lot of the work in their respective home studios, before coming together for analog processing and mastering.

“I think some of the tracks are two years old,” says Patrick. “The problem with the album is we weren’t sure what direction it was going in, so we wrote probably 100 songs and then picked the songs that seemed most relevant and worked best together.”

Fans can expect the album to be varied but cohesive. Patrick says the album is also harder and darker than some of their remixes.

“The first track features Justin Pearson of All Leather and has him screaming over some nasty bass lines,” says Patrick. “But we also have a spaced-out, Dutch house-esque, hip-hop tracks featuring Cerebral Vortex and a grunge-rock-inspired track featuring Annie, the Swedish pop star. It’s a wide variety of styles, but musically and aesthetically it’s all compatible.”

Leave a Comment