Home Nation in brief: Jan. 25, 2011

Nation in brief: Jan. 25, 2011

by admin January 25, 2011

Nation in brief: Jan. 25, 2011

by admin January 25, 2011

Cross-dressing day gets axed

A school in Toronto has decided to cancel its upcoming “Opposite Gender Day,” which sparked anger from both supporters and those opposed to the event. The special day would have seen participating students from kindergarten to grade eight at King City Public School attend their classes in the garb of the opposite sex. Apparently some parents didn’t support the premise of having their young girls cross-dressing for school, and a few complaints led to the end of the event. But now some parents who supported the idea aren’t happy that a few small complaints have ended what may have been a valuable learning exercise, according to parentcentral.ca. The school’s principal had approved it in the hopes that it would help kids understand what the other gender went through.

Penny-pinching Mountie pinched

A Mountie from B.C. is experiencing the other side of the law for a change well, for some change. The Burnaby-based officer has been charged with theft in connection with multiple instances in which the 37-year-old stole loose change from a desk at a community policing office, the QMI agency reported. Constable Derrick Holdernried was suspended in December after another officer noticed the coins, estimated at between $40 and $70 worth, were missing and an internal investigation was launched. He is awaiting his court appearance in mid-February. Nickel collector, kleptomaniac or just a jerk? You be the judge.

Hundreds make up U of T general assembly

The University’s of Toronto’s administration and governing council came under fire from over 200 students, faculty, staff and members of the community who came together last week to form an independent general assembly. The assembly was an exercise in self-governance, with discussions focusing on how to bypass the current governing structure to tackle concerns on their own, Maclean’s OnCampus reported. Those in attendance discussed the administration’s lack of response to their concerns on various issues with the university, like the corporatization of the school and presence of multiple donors on the governing council. They also split into working groups which focused on finding solutions to some of those issues. Participants voted to continue with another meeting in February.

Cross-dressing day gets axed

A school in Toronto has decided to cancel its upcoming “Opposite Gender Day,” which sparked anger from both supporters and those opposed to the event. The special day would have seen participating students from kindergarten to grade eight at King City Public School attend their classes in the garb of the opposite sex. Apparently some parents didn’t support the premise of having their young girls cross-dressing for school, and a few complaints led to the end of the event. But now some parents who supported the idea aren’t happy that a few small complaints have ended what may have been a valuable learning exercise, according to parentcentral.ca. The school’s principal had approved it in the hopes that it would help kids understand what the other gender went through.

Penny-pinching Mountie pinched

A Mountie from B.C. is experiencing the other side of the law for a change well, for some change. The Burnaby-based officer has been charged with theft in connection with multiple instances in which the 37-year-old stole loose change from a desk at a community policing office, the QMI agency reported. Constable Derrick Holdernried was suspended in December after another officer noticed the coins, estimated at between $40 and $70 worth, were missing and an internal investigation was launched. He is awaiting his court appearance in mid-February. Nickel collector, kleptomaniac or just a jerk? You be the judge.

Hundreds make up U of T general assembly

The University’s of Toronto’s administration and governing council came under fire from over 200 students, faculty, staff and members of the community who came together last week to form an independent general assembly. The assembly was an exercise in self-governance, with discussions focusing on how to bypass the current governing structure to tackle concerns on their own, Maclean’s OnCampus reported. Those in attendance discussed the administration’s lack of response to their concerns on various issues with the university, like the corporatization of the school and presence of multiple donors on the governing council. They also split into working groups which focused on finding solutions to some of those issues. Participants voted to continue with another meeting in February.