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Nation in Brief

by Marilla Steuter-Martin March 6, 2012

Reaching for the stars
Is it possible to dream too big? Sylvio Langevin, a Quebec City man who tried to sue for ownership of the Earth, the other planets in the solar system and several moons, doesn’t think so. As of last week, Langevin has been barred from filing any legal action without written permission from a judge following his latest scheme. He has filed 45 lawsuits since 2001, the latest of which filed a claim for nine planets, four of Jupiter’s moons and all the space in between. Judge Alain Michaud finally put his foot down and it looks as though he won’t be staking more claims anytime soon.

#OccupyMoncton comes to a close
Long after the international occupy movement died down, the last holdout in the Maritimes is finally packing up his tent. For a total of 138 days, Mathieu Bertin had been quietly occupying a small section of Moncton, N.B. Bertin even managed to keep his day job working at a courier service during his occupation, as well as relying on the generosity and support of both friends and strangers. Bertin’s passion for the cause certainly cannot be doubted after such a display, but he is now saying that after this life-changing experience, he will be moving on to bigger and better things.

Kiss student loans goodbye
With all this talk of student loans and tuition hikes, wouldn’t it be nice if the government just forgot about your student debt? Don’t get your hopes up just yet, although the feds did present spending estimates last week that include writing off more than $300 million in unpaid Canadian student loans. All the cases targeted are more than 10 years old. Despite the fact that 87 per cent of student loans are paid, this move will affect more than 98,000 cases where the government said “all reasonable efforts to collect the amount owed have been exhausted,” according to Postmedia News.

Let the finger pointing begin
Just when we thought election fraud was a thing of the past in Canada, reports of automated robo-calls popping up in 57 federal electoral ridings have politicians throwing allegations faster than they can fend them off. Elections Canada confirmed it has received 31,000 complaints coast to coast of misleading or harassing calls directing voters to the wrong polling station during the last election. Amidst the chaos, no one is coming forward to take the blame. This past week, the Tories did their best to shift the blame to their Liberal colleagues, with little success.

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