Engineers welcomed with nasty surprise

The Engineering and Computer Science Association (ECA) began welcoming new engineering and computer sciences students on Aug. 31 during their annual Frosh week.
Frosh is an ECA tradition that encourages them to get involved in the ECA and to get to know other new students. The ECA has organized several events where students have barbeques, play inflatable games and go to bars.
“The ECA has been organizing FROSH week since the early nineties, but only the last two years have been successful,” said Mike Nimchuk, the president of the ECA.
James D’Silva, the vp academic of the ECA and central organizer of this year’s Frosh said that he is trying to make sure that this year’s Frosh goes off without a hitch.
“We want Concordia students to have a stronger school spirit and I think that Frosh helps to encourage this. Also, students get to see that university is fun place to be, not just a place of studying,” said Surin Malik, an electrical and computer engineering representative.
On Aug. 31, new engineering and computer science students were gathered in an auditorium thinking that they had to write a placement exam. The students were all sent an official letter by the dean notifying them of the exam.
Containing some near impossible questions, the exam ended with the question, ‘How many future engineering students does it take to write a fake exam?’
“When I looked at the first page of the exam, I was like, oh boy,” said Sam Sabra, a computer science student.
Other students were suspicious of the intent of the exam. “I knew it was going to be a fun day,” said Peter Wilson, a computer engineering student.
After the exam, the students were split into groups and were taken on tours around Concordia. “We took the students to places where they can get cheap food, cheap drinks, cheap school supplies and anywhere else that they need to go,” said D’Silva.
The day ended with a barbecue and free food and drinks for all. Also the new students were given a Frosh bag filled with information about the ECA and a Frosh T-shirt.
Other Frosh events will be held on Sept. 6 and 7 on the corner of Guy and de Maisonnneuve. Non-ECA students are welcome to attend. On those days the ECA will have food, drinks, a disc jockey, inflatable games and will be giving away prizes.
On Sept. 6, in the evening, there will be a pub crawl, where students are
divided into groups and go from bar to bar will play drinking games. “We don’t mind if people just want to tag along and join in on the fun,” said Tyson Clinton, vp social for the ECA.
The last day of Frosh will have booths assembled for various ECA associations, so that students can become familiar with the different associations. Later on, there will be a final Frosh bash.
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