CORRECTION

The Concordian made a mistake by suggesting that students are being “bamboozled” by the Concordia Student Union Dental Plan in a feature article entitled “CSU dental plan not mandatory” that appeared in the Jan. 29, 2003 edition of the Concordian. The Dental Plan was initiated by a petition of over 500 Concordia students and mandated by a campus-wide student referendum held in March 1996.

The Concordian made a mistake by suggesting that students are being “bamboozled” by the Concordia Student Union Dental Plan in a feature article entitled “CSU dental plan not mandatory” that appeared in the Jan. 29, 2003 edition of the Concordian.

The Dental Plan was initiated by a petition of over 500 Concordia students and mandated by a campus-wide student referendum held in March 1996. The Dental Plan fee was approved and levied by the Concordia University Board of Governors in May 1996.

Contrary to the article, Lev Bukhman was VP Finance of the Students’ Society of McGill University in 1991-1992.

No former Concordia Student Union executives are employed by the Quebec Student Health Alliance (ASEQ), which was selected as the provider of the CSU Dental Plan via a competitive bidding process.

According to Bukhman, the Quebec Order of Dentists, is the regulatory body governing dentistry and has never disapproved of or criticized the CSU Dental Plan, the Student Dental Network or ASEQ.

The Concordian apologizes for the error.

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