The student Paralympian

VANCOUVER (CUP) — When he was small, Donovan Tildesley’s parents took him to water baby courses, where they bobbed up and down to nursery rhymes. Tildesley quickly developed an affinity for water, and swimming became a hobby. At age eight, he began racing for fun.

VANCOUVER (CUP) — When he was small, Donovan Tildesley’s parents took him to water baby courses, where they bobbed up and down to nursery rhymes. Tildesley quickly developed an affinity for water, and swimming became a hobby. At age eight, he began racing for fun.

“I really liked that idea of racing and getting there in a certain time and making the time faster,” he says. Soon after he joined the swim club at Vancouver’s Arbutus Club, with which he remained affiliated for six years. He began attending local meets, then provincials and nationals, taking on a personal trainer and extra hours of practice while working his way up through the ranks of competitive amateur swimming. Now, in his third year at the University of British Columbia (UBC), he has competed at an international level, medalling at meets in Sydney, Qu

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