Cyclists ‘dying’ to tell motorists their message on Car-Free Day

Downtown traffic was blocked Friday afternoon as close to 100 bike enthusiasts theatrically “died” in the street in attempt to raise awareness about the dangers of commuting. “This is an anti-car protest,” said Fanny Dulude, one of the participants. Covered in fake blood and bandages, Dulude said the Die-In brings up the issue of bicycle safety in Montreal and remembers all those who are hurt or killed by automobiles each year.

Downtown traffic was blocked Friday afternoon as close to 100 bike enthusiasts theatrically “died” in the street in attempt to raise awareness about the dangers of commuting.

“This is an anti-car protest,” said Fanny Dulude, one of the participants. Covered in fake blood and bandages, Dulude said the Die-In brings up the issue of bicycle safety in Montreal and remembers all those who are hurt or killed by automobiles each year.

In conjunction with Montreal’s Car-Free Day, the event not only promoted an environmentally-friendly method of transportation, but also commemorated the original Die-In that took place in 1976.

Exactly 30 years ago, an organization called “le monde

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