CUSSU and Admin still seeking resolution

Negotiations between campus support workers and the Concordia administration continue this week as both parties engage in back-and-forth exchanges. “If we’re not satisfied with the next counter proposal, we will use our next strike-day,” said Union President Andre Legault of the possibility of more strikes before the end of exams.

Negotiations between campus support workers and the Concordia administration continue this week as both parties engage in back-and-forth exchanges.

“If we’re not satisfied with the next counter proposal, we will use our next strike-day,” said Union President Andre Legault of the possibility of more strikes before the end of exams.

CUSSU’s executive is pushing to add two “monetary” clauses in the collective bargaining agreement and are now waiting on a counter-proposal from the administration.

Last month’s 24-hour walkout resulted in reduced hours and outright closings at Financial Aid and Awards, International Students Office, the Birks Student Centre and the health clinics on both campuses.

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