Letters to the editor:

Dear Editor, I was surprised to see the election coverage (or the lack thereof…) in last week’s Concordian with Wes Craven on the cover. It seems to me, that as the other half of Concordia’s independent news presence, it was up to you to offer your take on the madness that has engulfed our school for the last three weeks.

Dear Editor,

I was surprised to see the election coverage (or the lack thereof…) in last week’s Concordian with Wes Craven on the cover.

It seems to me, that as the other half of Concordia’s independent news presence, it was up to you to offer your take on the madness that has engulfed our school for the last three weeks.

Instead you chose to devote pages to Mr. Craven, who horrifies on the big screen but holds little sway on the real fears of students: the accessibility of their education, the transparency of their CSU and the lack of community at their university. Perhaps your efforts would have been better spent focusing on that.

Releasing a page of interviews in the edition that hit stands on the second day of voting doesn’t count guys!

I hope that next year we can all work to make the electoral process more transparent, and by extension, more democratic.

Sincerely, Beisan Zubi

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