Students Speak Out on CSU elections

The 2007 CSU Election results elicited a variety of responses from students after it was announced Friday that Unity had won by over 1,000 votes. “I’m actually kind of surprised at the results,” said Jaime Moar, a 22-year-old Psychology major. “I thought that the votes would have at least been a little closer.

The 2007 CSU Election results elicited a variety of responses from students after it was announced Friday that Unity had won by over 1,000 votes.

“I’m actually kind of surprised at the results,” said Jaime Moar, a 22-year-old Psychology major. “I thought that the votes would have at least been a little closer. . . So far, I haven’t seen much from the CSU besides the elections. I would just really like to know what they can do for me, because that’s what they are there for, to do things for me and every other student at Concordia.”

“It’s my first semester, so I didn’t really know too much about it,” said Vanessa Kerr, an Arts and Science student from the South Shore. “I knew some of the people running for Unity and I liked what they were going for, like maintaining the tuition freeze.”

“I voted for GoConcordia because I felt a change was needed,” said Amanda Fiscaletti, 20. She said she would have liked to see different representatives on the future CSU than the ones that are currently serving with the Experience slate. “Seeing how members of Unity have been in power in the past and no real changes occurred, I thought GoConcordia should have been given a chance.”

Many students cited both slate’s marketing strategies as the reasons they did or did not vote for a given party. “I thought both parties had positive and negative points to their strategies,” said Fiscaletti. “They both had at least one member of the campaign who stood out in my mind that did a great job at marketing themselves, and others that didn’t capture any attention!”

Chris Zacchia, 23, is in Communications. He described Unity’s marketing strategies as “annoying” and expressed his disregard for the party’s use of networking website Facebook as a marketing tool.

Saiswari Vairahsammy, a Human Relations major, said she just wants to “see them show that they’re doing something, that our money is going somewhere. Be it art, or concerts or shows, I just want the CSU to remain involved in student activities.”

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