Big Brother is watching: in your PC

I hate Bill Gates and I hate him even more knowing that he can do whatever he wants to my PC. Oh yes kids, those of you with a Mac are quite safe from “Big Brother”, but the rest of us are in a poor position. Late last week it was revealed that Microsoft has been “stealth-patching” computers running Windows.

I hate Bill Gates and I hate him even more knowing that he can do whatever he wants to my PC. Oh yes kids, those of you with a Mac are quite safe from “Big Brother”, but the rest of us are in a poor position.
Late last week it was revealed that Microsoft has been “stealth-patching” computers running Windows. What does that mean? It means that when you’re online, Microsoft servers forcibly load patches into your computer, altering pieces of software, without your knowledge.
“Oh,” you say. “But that’s okay; I’m a good righteous tech nerd who doesn’t trust anybody so I have my updates turned off.” NO. Even when updates are turned off, Microsoft has been altering files within your PC’s operating system. They do so WITHOUT YOUR KNOWLEDGE.
What’s even stranger is there is no information available on the “stealth-patches”.
Note, the files affected/created by the patching are as of yet not harmful nor noticeable. However, it is shocking that Microsoft is able to do this and it is a blatant violation of privacy. Being able to affect one’s PC, or examine its files unbeknownst to the user, is like someone going into your car and moving all the seats and mirrors.
The following site has a complete list of the programs affected by the “stealth-patching” so far (that we know of):
http://windowssecrets.com/2007/09/13/01-Microsoft-updates-Windows-without-users-consent
If that wasn’t bad enough, rumors also surfaced last week that Microsoft has published a patent application for “OS-based” adware. Imagine that while you’re playing a game, writing a document, chatting, or listening to tunes, pop-up ads will spring up onto your desktop interrupting that program from running until you’ve closed and seen the ad.
This type of advertising would be “triggered by sequences of user actions”. So unless you’re ready to have a book next to you filled with sequences of movements you can’t make if you want to avoid the adware, you’re just going to have to deal with it.
Can you imagine that? Are people actually going to sit still for this?

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