The grand return of the Coen brothers:

After producing two movies that got mixed reviews, the creative duo Ethan and Joel Coen is back on track with their latest film, No Country for Old Men. It is a story of fate, violence and the demands of life in a world that changes on a dime. An adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s novel, it begins in Texas with a Mexican drug-deal transaction gone wrong.

After producing two movies that got mixed reviews, the creative duo Ethan and Joel Coen is back on track with their latest film, No Country for Old Men.
It is a story of fate, violence and the demands of life in a world that changes on a dime. An adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s novel, it begins in Texas with a Mexican drug-deal transaction gone wrong. Llewelyn Moss (Josh Brolin) unwillingly stumbles on the deal and grabs the money.
While this windfall provides Moss with a new life, he now finds himself struggling to escape. Anton Chigurh (Javier Bardem), a serial killer and sociopath, who determines his victims’ fate with the flip of a coin.
Sheriff Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones), who is near the age of retirement, is investigating the sordid deaths that Chigurh leaves in his path.
Cinematographer Roger Deakins’ work on No Country for Old Men is stunning. His images are simply breathtaking. The Coens are well-known for their work on their films’ soundtracks, and this one is no exception. There is not a lot of music in the film, but sounds are accentuated, and it leaves us in a state of continuous anxiety. The atmosphere is tense from beginning to end.
The greatest revelation in this film is Javier Bardem’s chilling performance as Chigurh. He deserves all the praise for giving this evil character another layer and creating someone terrifying yet captivating. Tommy Lee Jones also provides a compelling performance as the aging Sheriff who appears overwhelmed by a world that is changing too quickly.
No Country for Old Men is a movie that will haunt you long after the credits roll. It is a reflection on life, fate and driving forces, going beyond a usual film. The Coen brothers offer us a movie that is as unique as the rest of their work, one that shows us that they are among the most innovative and clever filmmakers of their generation.

Total
0
Shares
Previous Article

Stingers split weekend against Ottawa teams

Next Article

Henry Rollins. What?

Related Posts

“We love paper!”

Who would've thought two self-described "paper lovers" could grab the cardboard contents of their recycling bins, mix it with shredded newspaper, and expose it as art in a gallery? Kyla Chevrier and JP King did just that in an attempt to subvert the use of paper as a vessel, and turn it into the object of attention.

“The music never died, folks!”

The Oscar Peterson Concert Hall was transformed into a swingin' back porch-style jam session last Friday, as music enthusiasts gathered together for the sixth annual Roots of Rock and Roll concert, an eight act jubilee featuring some of the top players in Montreal's roots scene.