Home Montreal stylist looks at spring trends

Montreal stylist looks at spring trends

by admin February 16, 2010

Montreal stylist looks at spring trends

by admin February 16, 2010

Although we are still braving sub-zero temperatures and bundling up in our Canada Goose down jackets, fashion is always one step ahead and the spring collections will be arriving in stores in the coming weeks.
Debby Tavares is a local fashion stylist, who has styled models for Montreal Fashion Week and numerous professional photo shoots. She is also a personal shopper and regularly works with women to perfect their looks and interpret the season’s trends. But, for those who can’t afford a personal stylist, Tavares shared some of her knowledge about what to expect when it comes to spring 2010 fashion.
While almost all trends come from high-end designers and are first seen at elaborate runway shows, Tavares advises individuals to be careful of taking them too literally. “Rather than aiming for a designer look, you should take inspiration from the colours, patterns and shapes of the garments seen in the collections and interpret them into wearable, everyday fashion,” she said.

According to Tavares, there are three main trend groups to be aware of while shopping in the next months: the ultra-feminine look, the technological look and the pastoral look.
In terms of the former, several major design houses went back to their romantic roots for their Spring/Summer 2010 collections. Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pier Paolo Piccioli, creative directors at fashion empire Valentino, put on a show full of refined, Victorian-style gowns and a colour palette of nude, rose, lavender and gold. To bring this look from the runway to the real world, Tavares suggests incorporating pieces with pastel hues and either subtle bows or lace into your closet. The key is not to go over the top and look like you’re wearing a costume.
Meanwhile at Lanvin, head designer Alber Elbaz, used a lot of modern, architectural ruffles to accentuate his simple, colourful pieces. The overall result was youthful, yet seductive. Many designers also showed floral prints, which Tavares thinks are essential for any spring wardrobe. She says they can range from faded and antique-looking, to bold and modern.
The feminine look can further be interpreted in a crisp, preppy way, as was seen at Stella McCartney and Céline. The latter paired clean-cut, beige skirts and trousers with black leather accents and with frill-free blouses and structured handbags, making the look extremely wearable.

The second big trend Tavares noticed on the spring/summer runways is the move towards technological, or outer space inspired designs. With the advancements in textile production, creativity is becoming increasingly more feasible in the fashion industry. Many designers took advantage of this for spring and showed pieces that were truly innovative. The digital prints and laser cuts shown by the late Alexander McQueen were unprecedented and unique. McQueen took inspiration from reptilian aquatic life and turned out a colourful, body-conscious collection full of leggings, mini dresses and jackets with embellished shoulders. Tavares says to expect to see a lot of neon colours and a continuation of the “80s trend showing up in stores.
Over at Proenza Schouler, the design duo took a cue from California surfer culture and featured lots of sporty pants and jackets as well as tie-dye tops and bottoms in their Spring/Summer 2010 line. Unlike the ones you remember from summer camp, these prints were in bright blue, green and yellow and resembled chic, edgy scuba gear. Graphic prints were also key at Givenchy, though they were in basic black and white.
For this look to be pulled off on the streets, Tavares says the main thing is to take one piece and make it the focus of the outfit while keeping the rest of your clothing simple. Though the head-to-toe look may seem intriguing on the catwalk, it doesn’t always translate well in real life.

The accessories for the technological look are very structural and contemporary. Sky-high wedges with cut out heels in bold colours, oversize printed bangles and the statement necklace still reign. The hardware trend from last season continues to prevail for those who like the tough, biker chick look.
Another trend to look out for this spring is clear, or Lucite accessories. Michael Kors showed minimalistic dresses with panels of plastic insets. This applies to jewellery as well, so watch out for numerous geometric, transparent pieces in stores.
The last and possibly most important style to anticipate, is the pastoral chic look. Chanel’s show always sets a precedent for the season to come and this year was no exception. Designer Karl Lagerfeld turned the Grand Palais in Paris into an outdoor barnyard setting, where models came down the runway in full country regalia. The short crinoline skirts in ivory and pastel colours immediately evoked Marie Antoinette playing peasant at the Petit Trianon. This idea of faux peasantry and poverty is instrumental for this look. Chanel also revealed what will be the shoe silhouette of the season &- the clog. This chunky, closed-toe, backless heel will without a doubt be seen in all the major retail chains come spring. If you’re feeling really daring, this is a trend to jump on.

Chanel wasn’t the only designer to head to the country. Ralph Lauren and Dolce & Gabbana took a more American spin on the trend, featuring soft, faded denim and lots of white eyelet details. Christopher Kane went for a Little House on the Prairie look with gingham dresses and pinafores. This trend is very easy to tone down and achieve, says Tavares. She advises shoppers to invest in lots of crisp, white traditional pieces, whether they be in the form of button-downs or dresses and to opt for loose-fitting boyfriend jeans over the usual skinny styles. Flowing peasant dresses in faded colours and prints will also be on trend.
As far as shopping for these styles, Tavares has a few tried and true stores. “H&M always has amazing prices and is great for cute feminine pieces,” she said. “Zara is so up to date on current runway trends and although it may be a little pricier, the clothing is very high quality.”
Regardless of your budget, these spring trends are easy to achieve with a little searching and creativity.

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Although we are still braving sub-zero temperatures and bundling up in our Canada Goose down jackets, fashion is always one step ahead and the spring collections will be arriving in stores in the coming weeks.
Debby Tavares is a local fashion stylist, who has styled models for Montreal Fashion Week and numerous professional photo shoots. She is also a personal shopper and regularly works with women to perfect their looks and interpret the season’s trends. But, for those who can’t afford a personal stylist, Tavares shared some of her knowledge about what to expect when it comes to spring 2010 fashion.
While almost all trends come from high-end designers and are first seen at elaborate runway shows, Tavares advises individuals to be careful of taking them too literally. “Rather than aiming for a designer look, you should take inspiration from the colours, patterns and shapes of the garments seen in the collections and interpret them into wearable, everyday fashion,” she said.

According to Tavares, there are three main trend groups to be aware of while shopping in the next months: the ultra-feminine look, the technological look and the pastoral look.
In terms of the former, several major design houses went back to their romantic roots for their Spring/Summer 2010 collections. Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pier Paolo Piccioli, creative directors at fashion empire Valentino, put on a show full of refined, Victorian-style gowns and a colour palette of nude, rose, lavender and gold. To bring this look from the runway to the real world, Tavares suggests incorporating pieces with pastel hues and either subtle bows or lace into your closet. The key is not to go over the top and look like you’re wearing a costume.
Meanwhile at Lanvin, head designer Alber Elbaz, used a lot of modern, architectural ruffles to accentuate his simple, colourful pieces. The overall result was youthful, yet seductive. Many designers also showed floral prints, which Tavares thinks are essential for any spring wardrobe. She says they can range from faded and antique-looking, to bold and modern.
The feminine look can further be interpreted in a crisp, preppy way, as was seen at Stella McCartney and Céline. The latter paired clean-cut, beige skirts and trousers with black leather accents and with frill-free blouses and structured handbags, making the look extremely wearable.

The second big trend Tavares noticed on the spring/summer runways is the move towards technological, or outer space inspired designs. With the advancements in textile production, creativity is becoming increasingly more feasible in the fashion industry. Many designers took advantage of this for spring and showed pieces that were truly innovative. The digital prints and laser cuts shown by the late Alexander McQueen were unprecedented and unique. McQueen took inspiration from reptilian aquatic life and turned out a colourful, body-conscious collection full of leggings, mini dresses and jackets with embellished shoulders. Tavares says to expect to see a lot of neon colours and a continuation of the “80s trend showing up in stores.
Over at Proenza Schouler, the design duo took a cue from California surfer culture and featured lots of sporty pants and jackets as well as tie-dye tops and bottoms in their Spring/Summer 2010 line. Unlike the ones you remember from summer camp, these prints were in bright blue, green and yellow and resembled chic, edgy scuba gear. Graphic prints were also key at Givenchy, though they were in basic black and white.
For this look to be pulled off on the streets, Tavares says the main thing is to take one piece and make it the focus of the outfit while keeping the rest of your clothing simple. Though the head-to-toe look may seem intriguing on the catwalk, it doesn’t always translate well in real life.

The accessories for the technological look are very structural and contemporary. Sky-high wedges with cut out heels in bold colours, oversize printed bangles and the statement necklace still reign. The hardware trend from last season continues to prevail for those who like the tough, biker chick look.
Another trend to look out for this spring is clear, or Lucite accessories. Michael Kors showed minimalistic dresses with panels of plastic insets. This applies to jewellery as well, so watch out for numerous geometric, transparent pieces in stores.
The last and possibly most important style to anticipate, is the pastoral chic look. Chanel’s show always sets a precedent for the season to come and this year was no exception. Designer Karl Lagerfeld turned the Grand Palais in Paris into an outdoor barnyard setting, where models came down the runway in full country regalia. The short crinoline skirts in ivory and pastel colours immediately evoked Marie Antoinette playing peasant at the Petit Trianon. This idea of faux peasantry and poverty is instrumental for this look. Chanel also revealed what will be the shoe silhouette of the season &- the clog. This chunky, closed-toe, backless heel will without a doubt be seen in all the major retail chains come spring. If you’re feeling really daring, this is a trend to jump on.

Chanel wasn’t the only designer to head to the country. Ralph Lauren and Dolce & Gabbana took a more American spin on the trend, featuring soft, faded denim and lots of white eyelet details. Christopher Kane went for a Little House on the Prairie look with gingham dresses and pinafores. This trend is very easy to tone down and achieve, says Tavares. She advises shoppers to invest in lots of crisp, white traditional pieces, whether they be in the form of button-downs or dresses and to opt for loose-fitting boyfriend jeans over the usual skinny styles. Flowing peasant dresses in faded colours and prints will also be on trend.
As far as shopping for these styles, Tavares has a few tried and true stores. “H&M always has amazing prices and is great for cute feminine pieces,” she said. “Zara is so up to date on current runway trends and although it may be a little pricier, the clothing is very high quality.”
Regardless of your budget, these spring trends are easy to achieve with a little searching and creativity.

Leave a Comment