Home Nation in brief: Sept. 7, 2010

Nation in brief: Sept. 7, 2010

by admin September 7, 2010

Nation in brief: Sept. 7, 2010

by admin September 7, 2010

Somebody write these hawks a hate letter

Residents living in Bayview, a region of Southwest Calgary, had their mail suspended for nearly two weeks after a family of hawks started “nosediving” a mail carrier in the area. The mailman was pestered to the point where he was forced to wear a bicycle helmet. Unfazed, the hawks just attacked the helmet, eventually managing to break it. The approximately 150 homes who lost service due to the birds are supposed to have their service restored today, but if not they can always wait for migration to take effect.

Calgary pride parade becomes campaign conflict

The annual pride parade in Calgary turned even more political after a mayoral candidate called out an opponent for not attending. Liberal MLA for Calgary Buffalo Kent Hehr posted a message on his website inviting opponent Ric McIver to join him at the event, as he had not attended in nine years. McIver said that a prior engagement to attend a Punjabi Cultural Festival prevented him from doing so. “He wants to be mayor of this great city. He should be a mayor for all citizens,” Hehr told CBC News. Only three mayoral candidates of a total 17 reportedly attended the parade put on for and by the lesbian/gay/transsexual community.

Alberta’s premier, Nancy Pelosi to discuss oilsands

Alberta’s premier Ed Stelmach will be meeting with Nancy Pelosi, the Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, next week in Ottawa and the province’s oilsands are the main subject on the agenda. Pelosi, known for her involvement on energy debates in the States’, reportedly expressed interested in learning more about the energy source and the meeting was set up by U.S. ambassador David Jacobson. Stelmach will be joined by Marlo Raynolds, executive director of environmental organization the Pembina institute, at the round table on Wednesday. Premiers Jean Charest and Brad Wall of Saskatchewan have also been invited along with representatives of a few other NGOs.

Ontario offers tax credit to keep kids active

In order to keep kids active and involved, the province of Ontario announced it will be introducing a tax credit offer to parents who are paying to enter their kids in activities. The credit specifically targets low-income family but will be available to everyone, and covers everything from dance to art and music, along with the usual sports and fitness activities. Parents can claim up to $500 dollars and as a refundable credit, low-income families that pay less taxes can still reap the benefits. A similar credit has existed on the federal level since 2007, but it only applies to physical activity.

Carleton frosh week a student-admin compromise

The annual frosh week held at Carleton university will have a much more academic tint than previous years according to CBC News, after the administration announced a take-over of student-run events last April. The announcement was met with intense student opposition, prompting a compromise which has resulted in an even mixture of social and education events this year. Now apparently students will be able to choose between getting wasted and partying, or meeting some of their professors, touring the campus and attending plays about being a good student. Hmm, I wonder which type of event is going to garner the most participation…

Somebody write these hawks a hate letter

Residents living in Bayview, a region of Southwest Calgary, had their mail suspended for nearly two weeks after a family of hawks started “nosediving” a mail carrier in the area. The mailman was pestered to the point where he was forced to wear a bicycle helmet. Unfazed, the hawks just attacked the helmet, eventually managing to break it. The approximately 150 homes who lost service due to the birds are supposed to have their service restored today, but if not they can always wait for migration to take effect.

Calgary pride parade becomes campaign conflict

The annual pride parade in Calgary turned even more political after a mayoral candidate called out an opponent for not attending. Liberal MLA for Calgary Buffalo Kent Hehr posted a message on his website inviting opponent Ric McIver to join him at the event, as he had not attended in nine years. McIver said that a prior engagement to attend a Punjabi Cultural Festival prevented him from doing so. “He wants to be mayor of this great city. He should be a mayor for all citizens,” Hehr told CBC News. Only three mayoral candidates of a total 17 reportedly attended the parade put on for and by the lesbian/gay/transsexual community.

Alberta’s premier, Nancy Pelosi to discuss oilsands

Alberta’s premier Ed Stelmach will be meeting with Nancy Pelosi, the Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, next week in Ottawa and the province’s oilsands are the main subject on the agenda. Pelosi, known for her involvement on energy debates in the States’, reportedly expressed interested in learning more about the energy source and the meeting was set up by U.S. ambassador David Jacobson. Stelmach will be joined by Marlo Raynolds, executive director of environmental organization the Pembina institute, at the round table on Wednesday. Premiers Jean Charest and Brad Wall of Saskatchewan have also been invited along with representatives of a few other NGOs.

Ontario offers tax credit to keep kids active

In order to keep kids active and involved, the province of Ontario announced it will be introducing a tax credit offer to parents who are paying to enter their kids in activities. The credit specifically targets low-income family but will be available to everyone, and covers everything from dance to art and music, along with the usual sports and fitness activities. Parents can claim up to $500 dollars and as a refundable credit, low-income families that pay less taxes can still reap the benefits. A similar credit has existed on the federal level since 2007, but it only applies to physical activity.

Carleton frosh week a student-admin compromise

The annual frosh week held at Carleton university will have a much more academic tint than previous years according to CBC News, after the administration announced a take-over of student-run events last April. The announcement was met with intense student opposition, prompting a compromise which has resulted in an even mixture of social and education events this year. Now apparently students will be able to choose between getting wasted and partying, or meeting some of their professors, touring the campus and attending plays about being a good student. Hmm, I wonder which type of event is going to garner the most participation…