Home City in brief: Nov. 16, 2010

City in brief: Nov. 16, 2010

by admin November 16, 2010

City in brief: Nov. 16, 2010

by admin November 16, 2010

Woodsworth spending questioned at trial

Some questionable spending by Concordia president Judith Woodsworth was brought to light at a Commission des relations du travail hearing into the firing of two former auditors last week, Le Journal de Montréal reported. Part of the justification for their firing was that the two individuals allegedly performed some questionable spending, so the auditors’ lawyer apparently decided to turn the tables on Woodsworth. The president was questioned about instances in which she had approved the reimbursement of monthly parking fees and alcohol for a reception held at her home. Woodsworth reportedly said that she was simply approving expenses already undertaken by the university, and none of the purchases mentioned were “personal expenses.”

Starcraft comes to Concordia

At last week’s Concordia Student Union council meeting, VP clubs and outreach Ramy Khoriaty announced four new clubs to be included in the already 60 plus group of student clubs at Concordia. They are the Concordia Starcraft Committee, the Moroccan Student Society, the Jordanian Student Association and the Mountain Biking and Cycling Club. Khoriaty also announced that the three clubs that are losing their offices in the Hall building this December have found new digs. ACSiON, ASAC and REHC will be moved to the K annex on Bishop Street Dec. 3. They will take over the offices of the Concordia University Parent Centre, which will be moving into the new TD building next to the MB at the end of November.

Pathological gambling addressed

A study released last week by Concordia and UdeM researchers found that close to 41,000 Quebecers are in danger of becoming pathological gamblers. Over 70 per cent of Quebec adults would have gambled at least once in the past year and the researchers indicated that Quebecers spend an average of $483 annually on gambling activities. The study also found a higher proportion of video lottery terminal gamers among men and young people aged 18 to 24. Some of the other problems that can stem from pathological gambling include alcohol and drug abuse. These findings are part of an ongoing project to offer recommendations for prevention and treatment.

Tony Blair puts his faith in McGill

Former British PM Tony Blair officially announced last Friday that his foundation had aligned itself with McGill for an extensive research project, the Faith and Globalization Initiative. The Montreal university is the only Canadian school participating in the initiative which involves research into the impact of religion on society. The research, which is being undertaken by Yale among others, is sponsored by the Tony Blair Faith Foundation, which strives to educate the public about religions in order to build understanding. Speaking in Montreal last week, Blair said that religion should have a place in politics, but a limited one.

Woodsworth spending questioned at trial

Some questionable spending by Concordia president Judith Woodsworth was brought to light at a Commission des relations du travail hearing into the firing of two former auditors last week, Le Journal de Montréal reported. Part of the justification for their firing was that the two individuals allegedly performed some questionable spending, so the auditors’ lawyer apparently decided to turn the tables on Woodsworth. The president was questioned about instances in which she had approved the reimbursement of monthly parking fees and alcohol for a reception held at her home. Woodsworth reportedly said that she was simply approving expenses already undertaken by the university, and none of the purchases mentioned were “personal expenses.”

Starcraft comes to Concordia

At last week’s Concordia Student Union council meeting, VP clubs and outreach Ramy Khoriaty announced four new clubs to be included in the already 60 plus group of student clubs at Concordia. They are the Concordia Starcraft Committee, the Moroccan Student Society, the Jordanian Student Association and the Mountain Biking and Cycling Club. Khoriaty also announced that the three clubs that are losing their offices in the Hall building this December have found new digs. ACSiON, ASAC and REHC will be moved to the K annex on Bishop Street Dec. 3. They will take over the offices of the Concordia University Parent Centre, which will be moving into the new TD building next to the MB at the end of November.

Pathological gambling addressed

A study released last week by Concordia and UdeM researchers found that close to 41,000 Quebecers are in danger of becoming pathological gamblers. Over 70 per cent of Quebec adults would have gambled at least once in the past year and the researchers indicated that Quebecers spend an average of $483 annually on gambling activities. The study also found a higher proportion of video lottery terminal gamers among men and young people aged 18 to 24. Some of the other problems that can stem from pathological gambling include alcohol and drug abuse. These findings are part of an ongoing project to offer recommendations for prevention and treatment.

Tony Blair puts his faith in McGill

Former British PM Tony Blair officially announced last Friday that his foundation had aligned itself with McGill for an extensive research project, the Faith and Globalization Initiative. The Montreal university is the only Canadian school participating in the initiative which involves research into the impact of religion on society. The research, which is being undertaken by Yale among others, is sponsored by the Tony Blair Faith Foundation, which strives to educate the public about religions in order to build understanding. Speaking in Montreal last week, Blair said that religion should have a place in politics, but a limited one.